Bacillus thuringiensis Cry5B Protein Is Highly Efficacious as a Single-Dose Therapy against an Intestinal Roundworm Infection in

submitted by: raroian
Latest research from UCSD on new, powerful cure against intestinal parasitic roundworms (soil transmitted helminths) like hookworms, whipworms, and Ascaris. These parasites infect 2 billion of the poorest peoples and are a leading source of disease burden in school-aged children. The world has virtually ignored the issues of less than adequate drugs and emerging parasite resistance. Here we turn to an organic solution, natural soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein (Cry5B)....

Green Fuel = Economic Development

submitted by: daochienergy
This video postulates that by creating "green fuel" cultivation and integrated processing facilities that take waste products from each other as feedstock (including algae & jatropha, anaerobic digesters, manure & wastewater processing, gasifiers, fish farms, dairy farms, and electric generating) that each becomes an independent, secure source of local energy (renewable gasoline, renewable diesel and renewable jet fuels) and expands the commercial reach for both products and raw...

Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in High HIV Prevalence Settings

submitted by: ahyde
Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in High HIV Prevalence Settings: What Can Mathematical Modelling Contribute to Informed Decision Making? Video by Catherine Hankins of UNAIDS. This relates to an article published in PLoS Medicine in September 2009 in which experts from UNAIDS, WHO, and the South African Centre for Epidemiological Modelling report their review of mathematical models estimating the impact of male circumcision on HIV incidence in high HIV prevalence settings *...

The New Anthelmintic Tribendimidine is an L-type (Levamisole and Pyrantel) Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonist

submitted by: raroian
Background Intestinal parasitic nematodes such as hookworms, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Trichuris trichiura are amongst most prevalent tropical parasites in the world today. Although these parasites cause a tremendous disease burden, we have very few anthelmintic drugs with which to treat them. In the past three decades only one new anthelmintic, tribendimidine, has been developed and taken into human clinical trials. Studies show that tribendimidine is safe and has good clinical...
Authors: Yan Hu, Shu-Hua Xiao, Raffi V. Aroian

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 4: Targeting M. tuberculosis Carbon Metabolism In Vivo (26:12)

submitted by: video_collector
All pathogens must acquire and assimilate nutrients from their hosts in order to grow and multiply -- our tissues are literally their food -- yet surprisingly little is known about this fundamental aspect of the pathogenic lifestyle. Accumulating evidence suggests that M. tuberculosis might utilize fatty acids as its principal carbon and energy source during infection. The fourth part of this lecture describes work in our laboratory that is focused on identifying the metabolic pathways that...

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 3: Phenotypic Heterogeneity and Antibiotic Tolerance (27:15)

submitted by: video_collector
The principal obstacle to successful treatment of tuberculosis is the lengthy duration of current regimens, which require administration of multiple drugs for 6-9 months. The requirement for prolonged therapy is attributed to sub-populations of bacillary "persisters" that are refractory to antimicrobials. The persisters are not drug-resistant in the conventional (heritable) sense and it is a mystery why they are spared whilst their genetically identical siblings are killed. The third part of...

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 2: Tools for Tuberculosis Control: Not Just a Problem of Implementation (28:18)

submitted by: video_collector
Tuberculosis remains one of the most important causes of human disease and death despite the introduction of vaccination in 1921 and chemotherapy in 1952. Although these interventions are inexpensive and widely available their impact is limited. The effectiveness of vaccination is unclear; in clinical trials, the protection conferred by vaccination has been variable and generally poor. Although chemotherapy can be highly effective, multiple drugs must be administered for 6-9 months to...

The Dynamic Bacterial Cell: Part 2: Escalating Infectious Disease Threat (39:37)

submitted by: video_collector
Many antibiotics, which we have taken foregranted since the 1950's, are now becoming ineffective because bacteria have developed ways of acquiring resistance. The development of new antibiotics is lagging behind the loss of the old ones in this race to combat infectious disease. Simultaneously, there is an increase in infectious diseases around the world due to over population, globalization and urbanization. This results in a lethal combination of emerging diseases and loss of effective...

Technical Issues Associated with Future Large-Scale Cellulosic Biofuels Production: Part 2: Cellulosic Biofuels (48:15)

submitted by: video_collector

In the second segment, the potential for various types of biofuels are compared and some of the technical challenges in production of cellulosic fuels are outlined.

Host-Pathogen Interaction and Human Disease: Part 2: Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Cancer (48:57)

submitted by: video_collector
Helicobacter pylori lives in the human stomach. It causes gastritis, ulcer disease and even gastric cancer. Some H. pylori can inject a protein, CagA, into gastric epithelial cells. CagA interacts with the tight junctions that bind cells together and with signaling molecules affecting motility and proliferation. CagA is associated with ulcer disease and cancer but we don't understand how it works to favor malignancy. Not long ago in history most humans carried H. pylori ; the incidence of...