Introduction to Biomedical Ontologies 1: What is an Ontology?

submitted by: jennifer.r.smith

While reading an article or looking at a website, have you ever seen the term “ontology” and wondered what that meant? Do you hear people talking about using ontologies and ask yourself what the hubbub is about? This video is designed to help answer those questions. Here is a beginner’s look at what an ontology is and why ontologies are an important tool in the scientist’s toolbox.

Evan Eichler on “Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions” - Part II

submitted by: JGI

Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 2 of 2.

Evan Eichler on “Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions” - Part I

submitted by: JGI

Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 1 of 2.

The Biology of Genomes (2008) with David Bentley Interviewed by Chris Gunter

Dr. David Bentley is Vice President and Chief Scientist at Illumina Inc, developing new DNA sequencing technology for fast, accurate sequencing of complex genomes. His major research interest is the study of human sequence variation. He was previously Head of Human Genetics and founding Member of the Board of Management at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, where he played leading roles in the Institute's contribution the human genome reference sequence, The SNP Consortium and the...

Telomeres and Telomerase: Their Implications in Human Health and Disease: Part 3: Stress, Telomeres and Telomerase in Humans (45:58)

submitted by: scivee-team
Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative...

Telomeres and Telomerase: Their Implications in Human Health and Disease

submitted by: scivee-team
Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleprotein reverse transcriptase, is important for long-term eukaryotic cell proliferation and genomic stability, because it replenishes the DNA at telomeres. Thus depending on cell type telomerase partially or completely (depending on cell type) counteracts the progressive shortening of telomeres that otherwise occurs. Telomerase is highly active in many human malignancies, and a potential target for anti-cancer approaches. Furthermore, recent collaborative...

Wellness and Diseases: Implications of Important Microbiota

submitted by: dougramsey
The microbiota in personalized preventative medicine: how do we get from here to there and what role does metagenomics play? Synopsis—In this session we will (i) identify major questions and hurdles we face in under standing the integration between the human microbiota and human biology (in health and disease) and (ii) determine how these major questions may be addressed and what tools/technologies are required to overcome cur rent obstacles. We will attempt to identify immediate and...

Diversity Profile of the Human Skin Microbiome in Health and Disease Elizabeth A. Grice, National Institutes of Health

submitted by: dougramsey

Elizabeth A. Grice of National Institutes of Health discusses "Diversity Profile of the Human Skin Microbiome in Health and Disease"

AMPA Ligands in Neuroprotection

submitted by: alex01
Michael Spedding (Institute Internatinales Servier, Paris, France) described how neuroprotection can be achieved by either by blockade or by stimulation of AMPA (a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) receptors. Low threshold AMPA receptor stimulation leads to the release of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) which is neuroprotective. Blockade of AMPA receptors reduces excitotoxicity leading to neuroprotection. BDNF is a major activity-dependent neurotrophic factor...

TGFß & Alzheimer's Disease

submitted by: alex01

R.A. Flavell (Yale University, New Haven, CT) discusses the role of Transforming Growth Factor ß (TGFß) in disease. In the central nervous system of a murine model of AD this cytokine appears to prevent macrophages from attacking ß-amyloid. Flavell visualizes that selective blockade of this TGFß
activity could lead to the destruction of plaques in patients with AD.