Science Behind the News: Influenza & Flu Vaccines

submitted by: nsf

Every flu season, Americans battle coughs, fevers and body aches. The flu is a respiratory illness caused by a virus, a pathogen that causes disease in the human body. To understand how the flu is caught, spread and treated, Duke University's Katia Koelle explains the biology of a virus and how it is transmitted. "Science Behind the News" is produced in partnership with NBC Learn.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Silencing the Menkes Copper-Transporting ATPase (Atp7a) Gene in Rat Intestinal Epithelial (IEC-6) Cells Increases Iron Flux via Transcriptional Induction of Ferroportin 1 (Fpn1)

submitted by: jfcollins
The Menkes copper-transporting ATPase (Atp7a) gene is induced in rat duodenum during iron deficiency, consistent with copper accumulation in the intestinal mucosa and liver. To test the hypothesis that ATP7A influences intestinal iron metabolism, the Atp7a gene was silenced in rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology. Perturbations in intracellular copper homeostasis were noted in knockdown cells, consistent with the dual roles of ATP7A in pumping...
Authors: Sukru Gulec, James F. Collins

biosights: Decemeber 23, 2013 - Tumor cells WASH away the extracellular matrix

submitted by: JCB
Tumor cells invade through extracellular matrices by forming actin-rich structures called invadopodia, which contain the transmembrane matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Monteiro et al. reveal that the Arp2/3 activating protein WASH works with the exocyst complex to deliver MT1-MMP from late endosomes to the invadopodial plasma membrane. This biosights episode presents the paper by Monteiro et al. from the December 23, 2013, issue of The Journal of Cell Biology and includes an interview with...

biosights: November 25, 2013 - Caspases work as branch managers

submitted by: JCB
When a growing axon nears its target, it arborizes, or branches, to form numerous synaptic connections. Campbell and Okamoto reveal that localized caspase activation downstream of Slit-Robo signaling promotes arbor dynamics and restricts arbor growth. This biosights episode presents the paper by Campbell and Okamoto from the November 25, 2013, issue of The Journal of Cell Biology and includes an interview with lead author Douglas Campbell (formerly at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute,...

History of Medicine. Plague and Vampirism in the Middle Ages.

submitted by: camdic
The Nachzehrer would be a special kind of vampire who lives in a constant state of numbness in his grave, without understanding what is happening around and just like a child, chewing spasmodically his dress. Martin Böhm wrote in 1601: "We have seen in times of the plague how dead people especially women - who have died of the plague make smacking noises in their graves, like a pig that is eating, and that while this smacking is going on the plague becomes much worse, usually in the...

MWV #81 - Sheldon Campbell - The Singing Microbiologist

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Sheldon Campbell sings about microbiology. Dr. Campbell teaches microbiology at Yale School of Medicine and he uses music to enhance his lectures. He has one song for every block of lectures he gives on a major topic. Songs he's written include a song about fungi, tick borne disease, tuberculosis and one that reviews all of microbiology in eight minutes. Dr. Campbell hasn't done any testing to see his songs are more effective at getting his message across but he does get the occasional...