The Symmetry of Uracil Translated into a Model Energy Genealogy

submitted by: hsrikm
Though synthesis of Uracil is not possible to accomplish from its' naturally apparent parts it is physically divisible into two symmetrical fragments that are mirror images of one another. A model is presented in animated form that associates a transparent energy divide to this situation as a basic universal parity that enables the existence of the cell as a genetic transmission, relates nucleic acid structure to a transparent energy scale that is based distances along a mobius...

The Laws of Physics, Paradox, and Orderly Conduct in the Randomness Zone

submitted by: hsrikm
A conceptualization of the universe as a nonrandom entity in light of a universal particular established from certain descriptive properties of space, but randomly behaving at all perspectives, is proposed as a outline for the interpretation of nature. This view enables the construction of a natural ethic in which many of the orderly conducts of science become exposed as inductive, falling short of being logically sound and valid, result in false interpretations and a permissiveness with...

How Drosha and Dicer work in RNA interference

submitted by: mdanderson

Animated demonstration on how Dicer and Drosha work in RNA interference.

RNA Interference Proteins Tied to Cancer Survival Rates

submitted by: mdanderson
Levels of two proteins in a woman's ovarian cancer are strongly associated with her likelihood of survival, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports in the Dec. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The study shows that women with high levels of Dicer and Drosha, two proteins that are vital to a cell's gene-silencing machinery, had a median survival of 11 years. For those with low levels of both proteins, median survival...

Protein Synthesis

submitted by: jmath

A demosntration of Protein synthesis expressed through dance. The film was directed in 1971 by Robert Alan Weiss for the Department of Chemistry of Stanford University and narrated by Paul Berg, a 1980 Nobel Prize winner for Chemistry. It is imprinted with the "free love" aura of the period, and continues to be shown in biology classes today. It has inspired a series of similar funny attempts at vulgarizing protein synthesis.