Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Injury and Recovery

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Biomedical engineer Cato Laurencin, at the University of Connecticut Health Center, describes his pioneering work in tissue regeneration, a field of research that could help athletes recover faster from knee ligament damage, the same injury that will cause alpine ski racer Lindsey Vonn to miss the Sochi Olympics.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Winter Games: Engineering Competition Suits

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t the 2014 Olympics, long track speed skater Shani Davis will be wearing what may be one of the most advanced competition suits ever engineered. Under Armour Innovation lab's Kevin Haley and polymer scientist and engineer Sarah Morgan, of the University of Southern Mississippi, explain how competition suits help improve athlete performance by reducing friction and improving aerodynamics.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the winter Olympic Games: Engineering the Half-Pipe

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Mechanical engineer Brianno Coller, a professor at Northern Illinois University, explains how engineers design the half pipe so that snowboarder Shaun White can get more air time and allow him to perform tricks.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Physics of Slope-Style Skiing

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Slope-style skiing is a gravity defying freestyle skiing event debuting in Sochi. Nick Goepper, a 2013 world champion, will need to follow the laws of physics and rotational motion in order to nail his tricks in his quest for Olympic gold.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

New Species of Sea Anemone Discovered by NSF Scientists in Antarctica

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During a routine test of an underwater robot, NSF scientists from University of Nebraska-Lincoln made a startling discovery...an entirely new species of sea anemone living inside the ice. For more information, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=130117&org=NSF&from=news

CES 2014: Barobo robots teach children algebra

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At the Consumer Electronics Show, CES 14, Barobo, Inc. showed the NSF their robot that helps teach children algebra in a completely new way. By taking algebra off the page and into the physical world, Barobo aims to inspire a new generation of mathematicians.

CES 2014: Innovega's wearable electronics allows users to see objects up close

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At the Consumer Electronics Show, CES 14, Innovega gave the National Science Foundation a demo of their contact lens, glasses technology that allows users to view things far in the distance and right in front of their face.

CES 2014: Rehabtek changes medical rehab methods

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At the Consumer Electronics Show, Rehabtek is shaking up the medical rehab industry with robotics like their ankle model designed to help children with it's interactive games.

Rehabtek is one of nearly 30 exhibitors funded by NSF this week at Eureka Park, which features new grassroots technology.

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ZPvk

CES 2014: Xandem Technology uses radio waves to monitor movement

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At the Consumer Electronics Show, CES 2014, Xandem Technology showed off a prototype that uses radio waves to track human body movement. Applications for this product could revolutionize industries like personal home security.

Xandem Technology is one of nearly 30 exhibitors funded by NSF this week at Eureka Park, which features new grassroots technology.

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ZPvk

CES 2014: SmarterShade uses optical filters to revolutionize window shades

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This demo at the CES 2014 from small business SmarterShade shows one of several possible applications for their window shading technology--images hidden in glass revealed by the precise position of optical filters. Though smart window technology has been around for a while, cheaper, more adaptable options are needed. SmarterShade is one of nearly 30 exhibitors funded by NSF this week at Eureka Park, which features new grassroots technology. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ZPvk