Expansion microscopy brings the brain in 3-D into focus

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While most efforts to understand the brain focus on new technologies to magnify small anatomical features, engineers at the MIT-based Center for Brains, Minds and Machines have found a way to make brains physically bigger. The technique, which the researchers call expansion microscopy, uses an expandable polymer and water to swell brain tissue to about four and a half times its usual size, so that nanoscale structures once blurry appear sharp with an ordinary confocal microscope. Expansion...

New, smaller PMIC chip - CES 2015

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A significant amount of real estate inside your cell phone is taken up by a chip called a power management integrated circuit (PMIC). The chip delivers power from the battery to different areas within the phone, an efficient but bulky system. Now, NSF-funded small business Lion Semiconductor has designed a chip that is two to three times smaller than existing ones. A smaller chip means more room for a bigger battery – and longer battery life – or a thinner, smaller device. Wonyoung...

Headset uses ear muscle signals for hands-free control – CES 2015

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Can you wiggle your ears? If so, you're a prime candidate to try out a new headset from Reach Bionics. The small business has created technology that harnesses EMG signals from ear muscles. The creators demonstrated the device at the 2015 International CES Eureka Park. Even if you're not an obvious ear-wiggler, the hands-free controller can respond to muscle signals to control a computer cursor, motorized wheelchair or video game. Learn more: http://www.reachbionics.com/

Empire Robotics demos soft gripper on ping pong balls - CES 2015

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At the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show, Empire Robotics displayed their innovative soft gripper technology by outcompeting human challengers with their precision ping pong tossing.

Empire Robotics plans to use this technology for industrial applications.

Computer Science Teachers Speak Out!

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Computer science teachers from across the country tell you what excites them about teaching computer science.

Conserving biodiversity in Central Africa

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The Congo basin is an unruly ribbon of tropical forest, over a million square miles spanning six countries in Central Africa. It is the second-largest contiguous tropical forest in the world. The basin is home to the classics of African wildlife – chimpanzees, elephants, gorillas – along with thousands of other less well-known species. This wealth of flora and fauna, much of it native to the region, is enough to qualify the Congo basin as a biodiversity hotspot: a biologically rich...

Organs on a chip

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Organs on a chip systems could transform the medical drug pipeline as we know it. Biomedical engineer Ali Khademhosseini explains how he and his team at MIT are engineering tissues outside of the human body and connecting different "organs" to solve some pressing challenges.

Engineering a Smart Bandaid

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What does it take to engineer a smart bandaid? Biomedical engineer Ali Khademhosseini walks us through the future of bandaids, and how he and his team at MIT are testing them.

Black holes and coffee - Scientists & Engineers on Sofas (and other furnishings)

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Over a cup of coffee, astrophysicist Dan Evans chats about black holes, his research and what’s on the horizon.

Credit: NSF

An in-mouth wafer to treat oral cancer– Biotech’s future

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To treat oral cancer, NSF-funded small business Privo Technologies has created a platform that delivers treatments directly to the affected area. Privo develops new classes of targeted treatments, such as chemotherapy drugs, designed to be delivered through the mouth’s mucous membranes. Privo founder Manijeh Goldberg talked about her company’s research at the 2014 BIO International Convention.