Building a Brain: Mysteries of the Brain

submitted by: nsf

Carlos Aizenman, a neuroscientist at Brown University, is studying the brains of tadpoles to understand how neural circuits develop and absorb information from the surrounding environment. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.

Brain States and Consciousness: Mysteries of the Brain

submitted by: nsf

Neurobiologist Orie Shafer at the University of Michigan is trying to understand how the brain's cells communicate in order to control sleep patterns. To help solve this mystery, Shafer is teaming up with mathematician Victoria Booth to study a tiny and very unlikely specimen: the fruit fly. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.

Emotional Brain: Mysteries of the Brain

submitted by: nsf

For years, researchers have struggled to understand how emotions are formed and processed by the brain. Now, neuroscientist Kevin LaBar and his graduate students at Duke University are using a virtual reality room to study how the brain reacts to both negative and positive emotions. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.

Evolving Brain: Mysteries of the Brain

submitted by: nsf

Using amazing new technologies, evolutionary neuroscientist Melina Hale and her graduate students at the University of Chicago are discovering that the basic movements of one tiny fish can teach us big ideas about how the brain's circuitry works. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.

Thinking Brain: Mysteries of the Brain

submitted by: nsf

Through neural connections, called synapses, the brain can process and store enormous amounts of information. Neuroscientist Gary Lynch at the University of California, Irvine explains how this incredibly complex communication process allows animals to learn and remember. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.

3D Tele-Rehabilitation: Beyond Today’s Internet

submitted by: nsf
At the Beyond Today’s Internet Summit, researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas showed a working prototype of a next generation communication system that uses 3D video and force feedback devices to virtually recreate a physical therapy session between a patient and a therapist.   3D models of the two participants are captured using off the shelf Microsoft Kinect 3D Cameras and the models are placed in a shared virtual environment of one’s choosing. To simulate the physical...

Navy veteran studies genetic variation - Scientists & Engineers on Sofas (and other furnishings)

submitted by: nsf

Graduate Research Fellow Amy Battocletti is a Navy veteran who was awarded a Graduate Research Fellowship in 2014. She’s a doctoral candidate in biology at Georgetown University conducting research on the impact of genetic variation within plant species in salt marsh ecosystems.

Credit: National Science Foundation

Shoe-based sensor system smartens up gait rehabilitation and therapy

submitted by: nsf
It may look like an insole, but this Smart Shoes system developed at the Mechanical Systems Control Lab at UC Berkeley could help physical therapists get their patients walking better, faster. Sensors capture information to create a detailed picture of the patient's gait and walking abnormalities, while real-time visual feedback helps patients and therapists see and measure change and progress. The result: made-to-order physical therapy for maximum impact. Credit: National Science...

Forensics: Follow the Science

submitted by: nsf
Forensic science is an integral part of the American judicial process--essential to both prosecutions and defenses. However, the field has also come under scrutiny. A briefing on May 12 at the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the American Psychological Association, highlighted how the use of the scientific method can inform the field of forensics and ways to improve judicial system outcomes through evidence-based inquiry....

Basic Research to Bridge Sensors

submitted by: nsf
Mehdi Kalantari Khandani at the University of Maryland has created a sensor system that constantly monitors different types of stresses on bridge structures and, when it detects anything unusual, alerts those who need to know. But Mehdi's initial research had nothing to do with bridges. This is the story of how Dr. Khandani's basic research on ultra-low-power sensor networks ultimately led to low-maintenance bridge sensors that can help keep an eye on the structural integrity of our...