Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 1: Tuberculosis: The Once and Future Plague (27:33)

submitted by: video_collector
Human population growth and urbanization have accelerated dramatically in recent centuries, providing unprecedented opportunities for microbes that use our bodies as vehicles for their own propagation and transmission. These conditions have led to the emergence of virulent new pathogens and the increased prevalence of "classic" scourges, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This tenacious microbe is transmitted via infectious aerosols produced by individuals with pulmonary tuberculosis....

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 3 of 3) MWV23

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
In the final episode of this 3 part video series on how to optimize antibiotic use and minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens, Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, goes in depth on the use of antimicrobial drugs in agriculture, their efficacy, and adverse human health consequences. Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine, discusses policy, regulatory and...

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 2 of 3) MWV

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
On September 18, 2008 at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine and Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, discussed how to optimize antibiotic use and how to minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens. In part 2 of this 3 part video series, Dr. Levy discusses how antibiotic resistance develops, the development...

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 1 of 3) MWV

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Will we become defenseless against bacteria? Will bacteria always find a way to infect and even kill us? The emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria poses an enormous problem around the world. Scientists believe that the overuse of antibiotics is increasing the appearance of these pathogens. In the US, increasing casualties resulting from drug resistant staphylococcus infections received wide media attention. While antibiotics only work on bacterial infections, many patients...

West Nile Virus MWV19

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
West Nile virus entered the United States in 1999 and is now considered a seasonal epidemic that starts in the summer and continues into the fall. First isolated in Uganda in 1937, the virus can cause severe human meningitis or encephalitis in 1% of those infected. In 2007 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reported 124 fatalities. The rapid spread of West Nile virus has put local and state mosquito surveillance programs on the front line of public health and disease preparedness. In...

The One Health Initiative MWV18

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Ronald Atlas, former President for the American Society for Microbiology, discusses the new One Health Initiative that recognizes the inter-relationships among human, animal, and environmental health and seeks to enhance communication, cooperation, and collaboration in integrating these areas for the health and well-being of all species. Development of the One Health Initiative began in 2007 with the American Veterinary Medical Association's (AVMA) efforts to strengthen communications and...

The Real Lab: Orthopaedic Mechanobiology

submitted by: eternes

University of Maryland students take a fun look into the "real lab" life of three biomechanical engineering undergraduates who research how engineering and biology can help our health.

MWV07 - ASM In Zambia

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
This video, produced in partnership with Global Health TV, showcases the American Society for Microbiology's laboratory capacity building initiatives in Zambia. The film focuses on ASM's support to the Zambian Ministry of Health and US government agencies in the strengthening of clinical microbiology services with the objective of integration of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV/AIDS laboratory infrastructure. Consultants representing ASM have traveled to Zambia to train researchers on diagnostics...

Return to Zambia MWV 17

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
The American Society for Microbiology is helping African nations foster a scientific community that is better able to address the current and future problems that threaten not only the local population, but the world at large. Like many African countries, Zambia and South Africa are deeply affected by HIV and tuberculosis, as well as a number of other infectious diseases. In March of 2008, ASM President Cliff Houston, Ph.D., traveled to Zambia and South Africa to gauge and assess the...

Breast cancer genes protect against some leukemias and lymphomas

submitted by: BernardFriedenson
Carriers of mutations in the breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 have very high lifetime risks for breasts/ovarian cancer. Products of either gene have multiple functions including involvement in error-free double strand break repair. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are both components of a DNA damage response pathway that has the ability to return fragments of broken chromosomes back into their correct positions without ligating them elsewhere. But cancers at other sites may also occur without this...