Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Science of Ice

submitted by: nsf

The science that makes ice slippery also makes the Olympic Winter Games possible. But exactly what makes ice slippery? Ken Golden, a mathematician at the University of Utah, explains how the unique surface of ice makes the slide and glide of winter sports possible.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Injury and Recovery

submitted by: nsf

Biomedical engineer Cato Laurencin, at the University of Connecticut Health Center, describes his pioneering work in tissue regeneration, a field of research that could help athletes recover faster from knee ligament damage, the same injury that will cause alpine ski racer Lindsey Vonn to miss the Sochi Olympics.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Winter Games: Engineering Competition Suits

submitted by: nsf

t the 2014 Olympics, long track speed skater Shani Davis will be wearing what may be one of the most advanced competition suits ever engineered. Under Armour Innovation lab's Kevin Haley and polymer scientist and engineer Sarah Morgan, of the University of Southern Mississippi, explain how competition suits help improve athlete performance by reducing friction and improving aerodynamics.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the winter Olympic Games: Engineering the Half-Pipe

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Mechanical engineer Brianno Coller, a professor at Northern Illinois University, explains how engineers design the half pipe so that snowboarder Shaun White can get more air time and allow him to perform tricks.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Physics of Slope-Style Skiing

submitted by: nsf

Slope-style skiing is a gravity defying freestyle skiing event debuting in Sochi. Nick Goepper, a 2013 world champion, will need to follow the laws of physics and rotational motion in order to nail his tricks in his quest for Olympic gold.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Genesis Non-Newtonian

submitted by: kelemengabi

Standing wave colection to concentric radial for human face standing wave soliton.
Music by Gabriel Kelemen