Magnetic Thinker

submitted by: SirZerp

If the statue was made of Neodymium and magnetized thru the vertical axis, the colors show the energy levels and the white dots show the magnetic 'B' field lines.

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Olympic Movement and Robotic Design

submitted by: nsf

Professor Raffaello D'Andrea at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, describes how control systems engineering is laying the groundwork for the design of more "athletic" robots.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Winter Games: Figure Skating Physics

submitted by: nsf

Figure skating has become one of the most popular events at the Winter Olympics. Head of the Physics Department at the University of Michigan Brad Orr explains that good balance, or stability, is basic to everything a skater does--and that begins with understanding the center of mass.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Alpine Skiing and Vibration Damping

submitted by: nsf

Kam Leang, a professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Tom Watson, of Watson Performance in Hood River, Ore., describe how advanced materials and engineering help reduce unwanted vibration, optimizing the performance of athletes.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Science of Snow

submitted by: nsf

Snow is an essential part of the 2014 Olympics. How it's formed and how it reacts has been studied by scientists for centuries and continues to this day. Sarah Konrad, a former Winter Olympian who is also a glaciologist at the University of Wyoming, along with Cort Anastasio, a chemistry professor at the University of California, Davis, discuss how humidity and temperature help form snow.

Provided by the National Science Foundation

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Engineering Faster and Safer Bobsleds

submitted by: nsf

Michael Scully, of BMW DesignWorks USA, and mechanical engineer Mont Hubbard, professor emeritus at the University of California, Davis, explain the engineering challenges associated with making sleds faster and tracks safer.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn