Making Muscle: Tissue Engineering in MUSC's Department of Surgery

submitted by: mcgheek
Samir Fakhry, M.D., Chief of MUSC's Division of General Surgery, and Michael Yost, PhD, Associate Chair of Research in MUSC's Department of Surgery, discuss the promise of engineered tissues for the treatment of surgical and trauma patients. Engineered tissue can instruct the body to regenerate native tissue instead of generating scar, improving cosmetic and functional outcomes. Bioprinters, 3D printers for living tissue, will help realize the promise of engineered tissue for clinical care.k

Congenital Heart Defects: Could the Developing Heart Hold the Key to New Therapies?

submitted by: mcgheek

Andrew M. Atz, M.D., Chief of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at MUSC's Children's Hospital, and Kyu-Ho Lee, M.D., PhD, a developmental biologist at MUSC's Cardiovascular Developmental Biology Center, discuss how better understanding the gene signaling involved in the embryonic development of the heart could lead to new adjunctive therapies for congenital heart defects. Learn more about Dr. Lee's work in the November 2013 issue of Progressnotes at MUSChealth.com/progressnotes

Responsive Neurostimulation to Control Partial Epileptic Seizure

submitted by: mcgheek
Jonathan C. Edwards, M.D., Director of MUSC's Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, who participated in the clinical trial that led to recent FDA approval of responsive neurostimulation (RNS) for partial epileptic seizure, discusses how RNS offers for the first time two-way communication with the brain. The RNS device first records seizure activity and, once the electronic signature of a patient's seizures is identified, is programmed to recognize and disrupt that signature.Read “Conversing with...

Unrelated Donor Bone Marrow Transplant for Sickle Cell Disease

submitted by: mcgheek
Jennifer Jaroscak, M.D., of MUSC Children's Hospital discusses bone marrow transplant (BMT) as a cure for patients with sickle cell disease. She describes a new reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen being trialed at MUSC for BMTs from well-matched unrelated donors in the SCURT study. RIC is safer for unrelated donor transplant because, unlike myeloablative BMTs, it suppresses but does not destroy the patient's bone marrow. Find out more about the SCURT study and reduced-intensity...

Adherence to a Vegetable-Fruit-Soy Dietary Pattern or the Alternative Healthy Eating Index Is Associated with Lower Hip Fracture Risk among Singapore Chinese

submitted by: schs
Data on overall dietary pattern and osteoporotic fracture risk from population-based cohorts are limited, especially from Asian populations. This study examined the relation between overall diet and hip fracture risk by using principal components analysis (PCA) to identify dietary pattern specific to the study population and by using the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) 2010 to assess dietary quality. The Singapore Chinese Health Study is a prospective population-based cohort that...
Authors: Zhaoli Dai, Lesley M. Butler, Rob M. van Dam, Li-Wei Ang, Jian-Min Yuan, Woon-Puay Koh

Dietary actinidin from kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Hayward) increases gastric digestion and the gastric emptying rate of several dietary proteins in growing rats

submitted by: cmontoya
Dietary actinidin influences the extent to which some dietary proteins are digested in the stomach, and it is hypothesized that the latter modulation will in turn affect their gastric emptying rate (GE). In this study, the effect of dietary actinidin on GE and gastric digestion of 6 dietary protein sources was determined in growing rats. Each dietary protein source [beef muscle, gelatin, gluten, soy protein isolate (SPI), whey protein isolate, and zein] was included in 2 semisynthetic diets...
Authors: Carlos A. Montoya, Jason P. Hindmarsh, Lucrecia Gonzalez, Mike J. Boland, Paul J. Moughan, Shane M. Rutherfurd