Central nervous system tumors symptoms and treatment

submitted by: mdanderson
Download from iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/central-nervous-system-tumors/id431... A central nervous system tumor starts as a primary cancer originating in the brain, spinal cord or spinal fluid and then spreads to the nervous system. The most common form is glioblastoma multiforme. John DeGroot, M.D., associate professor in Neuro-Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system tumors.

Firing up innate immunity to stop asthma attacks

submitted by: mdanderson
The National Institutes of Health will provide $2.4 million to an MD Anderson researcher to advance a completely new approach to stifling asthma attacks. Scott Evans, M.D., of MD Anderson's Department of Pulmonary Medicine, was named an NIH New Innovator for his proposal to jump-start a rapid immune response to stymie viral infections before they can provoke asthma attacks. "Asthma affects 8 percent of Americans -- 26 million adults and children -- and its incidence continues to grow for...

Use it or lose it: Eating and swallowing exercises show benefit in throat cancer patients

submitted by: mdanderson

Kate Hutcheson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery, discusses a new study examining the benefits of swallowing and eating exercises for patients undergoing radiation and chemotherapy for head and neck cancers.

Opera singer Pablo Romero sings with the MD Anderson employee choir

submitted by: mdanderson

Opera singer Pablo Romero sang with the MD Anderson employee choir on December 19th, 2012. In this video, he performs favorite Christmas songs.

Volunteer Makes a Difference for Pediatric Patients

submitted by: mdanderson

When Mary Belle Wooddy began volunteering at MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital, the five-year survival rate for children with cancer was less than 60%. Wooddy, who has volunteered in the pediatric playroom for 35 years, has seen that survival rate rise to 80% along with a lot of other changes at the hospital.

For more information on MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital, visit http://bit.ly/opA4S

MD Anderson Breaks Ground on the Zayed Building

submitted by: mdanderson
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center broke ground on the Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan Building for Personalized Cancer Care on Wed., Nov. 16, making way for the 12-story, 615,000 square foot building. The Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan Foundation gave MD Anderson a $150 million transformational grant in 2011 to accelerate the pace of personalized cancer therapies and pancreatic cancer research. From this grant, $100 million will be used to build the Zayed Building for...

Helping Patients Get Organized

submitted by: mdanderson
Cancer patients can and should get organized, says professional organizer Janice Simon, project director in the Office of Academic Affairs in the Department of Faculty Development . Though collecting and sorting paperwork may seem time-consuming and overwhelming, consolidating personal documents, health records and questions for doctors benefits both patient and physician by reducing appointment lengths and preventing confusion. Going digital may also be a valuable strategy for staying...

Dr. Curtis Pickering, Beyond Variation in Head and Neck Cancer Genomics

submitted by: mdanderson
http://bit.ly/oK2bhy The first comprehensive studies of genetic variation in head and neck squamous cell cancers have uncovered mutations that may help refine treatment for patients with the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The researchers found that the tumor-suppressing gene TP53 was mutated in 47 percent of the tumors, by far the most commonly affected gene. So far, attempts to restore normal expression of the p53 protein, and...

Dr. Mitchell Frederick Discusses NOTCH1 and Cancer

submitted by: mdanderson
http://bit.ly/oK2bhy The first comprehensive studies of genetic variation in head and neck squamous cell cancers have uncovered mutations that may help refine treatment for patients with the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The researchers found that the tumor-suppressing gene TP53 was mutated in 47 percent of the tumors, by far the most commonly affected gene. So far, attempts to restore normal expression of the p53 protein, and...

Dr. Jeffrey Myers Explains Genetic Variations in Head and Neck Cancer

submitted by: mdanderson
http://bit.ly/oK2bhy The first comprehensive studies of genetic variation in head and neck squamous cell cancers have uncovered mutations that may help refine treatment for patients with the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The two multi-institutional studies, both published online on the Science Express feature of the journal Science, found: • Mutations that affect an unexpected tumor-suppressing role of the NOTCH1 gene;...