SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: BLADE RUNNERS

submitted by: nsf

The U.S. speed skating team has two best hopes against a powerful South Korean team that took three- of-a-possible-four golds in Torino: Apolo Ohno and J.R. Celski--an 18-year-old World Champion in his first Olympics. Speed skating is all about force and movement--what, in physics, are known as Newton's First Three Laws of Motion. Celski and physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University explain.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: FIGURING OUT FIGURE SKATING

submitted by: nsf

Every four years, we watch the stakes for Olympic figure skaters get higher, as they try to increase rotation in the air with their triple axels and quadruple toe loops. How do they do that? It's a scientific principle that we asked Olympic hopeful Rachael Flatt, and Deborah King, an associate professor in the Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences at Ithaca College, to help explain.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: BANKING ON SPEED

submitted by: nsf

The winter games in Vancouver provide a chance for the United States' four-man bobsled team to win its first gold medal in more than 60 years. And with the help of Paul Doherty, senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, Deborah King, associate professor in the Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences at Ithaca College, physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University, and bobsled designer Bob Cuneo, the team explains how they hope to accomplish this feat.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: TIRES AND PRESSURE

submitted by: nsf

NASCAR tires don't have "air pressure" because they're filled with nitrogen. The culprit responsible for increasing tire pressure during a race is friction. Using dry nitrogen gas helps the team predict how hot the tire will get and how much the pressure will "build" during a race.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: GRIP

submitted by: nsf

There's one thing every driver always want more of: Grip. Grip is the frictional force that holds the tires on the track, but crew chiefs like Steve Letarte describe it as a 'warm and fuzzy feeling' when you have it. Whether mechanical or aerodynamic, more is always better.

Science of NFL Football - Torque

submitted by: nsf
"Science of NFL Football" is a 10-part video series funded by the National Science Foundation and produced in partnership with the National Football League. In this segment, NBC's Lester Holt describes what torque is and how the application of this force on an object causes it to spin. Professors Tony Schmitz of the University of Florida and Jim Gates of the University of Maryland explain that battles on the line of scrimmage are won by finding a player's center of mass and applying torque...

Science of NFL Football - Newton's Second Law of Motion

submitted by: nsf
"Science of NFL Football" is a 10-part video series funded by the National Science Foundation and produced in partnership with the National Football League. In this segment, NBC's Lester Holt breaks down Isaac Newton's Second Law of Motion and how it can effects the flight of the football as place kickers shoot for the goal posts. Professors Tony Schmitz of the University of Florida and Jim Gates of the University of Maryland explain why it truly can be "hit or miss" when it comes to...

Optical Micromanipulations--Basic Principles and Force Measurements

submitted by: icamvid

Eric Dufresne gives a talk at LC2CAM conference about how optical tweezers and blinking optical tweezers can be used to work with microscopic objects.

Uniqueness, Self Belonging and Intercourse in Nature-New Version

submitted by: hsrikm
Biological organization is discussed within a holistic framework . A new orientation is presented of natural processes with an approach in model construction that is focused strictly on physical form and centered away from abstractions that escape the perceptual senses, lead towards the postulation of non-verifiable and non-witnessible entities. A universal construction composed of first perspective representations of path, witness as unique loci in volumes of space delineated as...

Anthropology and Parallelism : The Individual as a Universal

submitted by: hsrikm
It is difficult to define perspective within sets that are self belonging. For example in the study of mankind, anthropology, both men and their studies fall into the same category that contains the topic outline. This situation entails a universal quality of uniqueness, an instance of, to the topic of anthropology that almost may be viewed in parallel to the topic of nature as the set of unique particulars. Yet one might assent to the notion in the inclusive study of man, anthropology,...
Authors: Marvin Kirsh