Jay Keasling's keynote address at 2010 DOE JGI User Meeting

submitted by: JGI

Jay Keasling, CEO of the Joint BioEnergy Institute, delivers the opening keynote on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting.

America's Climate Choices

submitted by: earthandlifescience
In a new video from the National Academies, experts serving on the America's Climate Choices study committee and panels talk about the project, which aims to inform and guide the nation's response to climate change. The video takes an in-depth look at the process through which these experts will come to consensus, and highlights how crucial the choices we face now will be for decades to come. Congressman Alan Mollohan (D-WV) provides his perspective as the initiator of the project. The...

Fine Details

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Authors: Robert Monroe

Fine Details

submitted by: ucsandiego
Scripps researchers tackle the holy grail of climate change modeling -- What happens in Vegas may stay in Vegas, but what happens on the way there is a different story. As imaged by Lynn Russell, a professor of atmospheric chemistry at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, and her team, air blown by winds between San Diego and Las Vegas gives the road to Sin City a distinctive look. http://explorations.ucsd.edu/Features/2009/Fine_Details/

Climate Change and Southern California Ecosystems

submitted by: ucsandiego
Climate change will disturb ecosystems found here and in rest of California, posing a challenge for managers and policy makers. On April 30, Elsa Cleland will describe what we know about the coming changes how plant communities are likely to respond, and what we still need to find out in order to protect important natural habitats. http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/newsrel/events/04-09NatureMatters.asp

Scientists From Across the Globe Warn of Drastic Water Shortages

submitted by: ucsandiego
In the Sierra Neveda, snowpack will shrink by 30 to 90 percent by the end of the century. On the other side of the planet, in the Himalayas, about 70 percent of glaciers are set to disappear. These changes are both caused by climate change and will lead to dramatic water shortages for hundreds of millions of people across the globe, scientists said during a press conference Wednesday at UC San Diego. http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/thisweek/2009/05/11_icemelt.asp

Carbonated Oceans

An overload of carbon dioxide is acidifying seawater, posing a subtle but profound threat to marine invertebrates.

Rising Tide

It’s not the extra few feet of water that make sea level rise so dangerous. It’s the extra few feet during a storm during El Niño during high tide, say researchers.

Emperors of the Extreme

submitted by: ucsandiego

Emperor penguins can flourish in locales where few other animals roam. But scientists now wonder if they can adapt to a new threat: climate change.