Science of the Winter Olympic Winter Games: Engineering Competition Suits

submitted by: nsf

t the 2014 Olympics, long track speed skater Shani Davis will be wearing what may be one of the most advanced competition suits ever engineered. Under Armour Innovation lab's Kevin Haley and polymer scientist and engineer Sarah Morgan, of the University of Southern Mississippi, explain how competition suits help improve athlete performance by reducing friction and improving aerodynamics.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the winter Olympic Games: Engineering the Half-Pipe

submitted by: nsf

Mechanical engineer Brianno Coller, a professor at Northern Illinois University, explains how engineers design the half pipe so that snowboarder Shaun White can get more air time and allow him to perform tricks.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Physics of Slope-Style Skiing

submitted by: nsf

Slope-style skiing is a gravity defying freestyle skiing event debuting in Sochi. Nick Goepper, a 2013 world champion, will need to follow the laws of physics and rotational motion in order to nail his tricks in his quest for Olympic gold.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

CES 2014: Barobo robots teach children algebra

submitted by: nsf

At the Consumer Electronics Show, CES 14, Barobo, Inc. showed the NSF their robot that helps teach children algebra in a completely new way. By taking algebra off the page and into the physical world, Barobo aims to inspire a new generation of mathematicians.

Science Behind the News: Predictive Policing

submitted by: nsf

"The Los Angeles Police Department is using a new tactic in their fight against crime called “predictive policing.” It's a computer program that was originally developed by a team at UCLA, including mathematician Andrea Bertozzi and anthropologist Jeff Brantingham. “Science Behind the News” is produced in partnership with NBC Learn.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science Behind the News: Opinion Polls and Random Sampling

submitted by: nsf
During political elections, news organizations often use public opinion polls to help gauge which candidate is the front runner, and why. University of Michigan's Dr. Vincent Hutchings explains the science of random sampling that makes it possible to query a few hundred or thousand people and use that data to accurately determine how the general public might vote. "Science Behind the News" is produced in partnership with NBC Learn. Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC...