submitted by: jcbradley
Jean-Claude Bradley presents the second lecture for Chemical Information Retrieval at Drexel University for Fall 2011 on September 30, 2011. The talk covers finding chemical property data on free and commercial databases, including Reaxys, SciFinder, ChemSpider and Google. An example is shown where an incorrect melting point for diazepam on the web and Reaxys was identified by carefully reading the original article. The use of Google Apps Scripts and other web services are covered....

An Efficient Publication Process

submitted by: bartneck

In this video tutorial, we introduce an efficient publication process. It starts with structuring thoughts, and assembling all the elements in a text editor. Next, we demonstrate how to manage references and how to include figures. Last, we demonstrate the usage of Latex to automatically layout a document.

Cheminfo Retrieval Class Six FA09

submitted by: jcbradley
This is the lecture from the sixth Chemical Information Retrieval class at Drexel University on October 29, 2009. It starts with a review of some of the new questions answered by students from the chemistry publishing FAQ, which covers patent information and accessing electronic journals at Drexel. Tony Williams submitted a puzzle to resolve conflicting structures in ChemSpider, which is too difficult to be a regular assignment. It requires re-analyzing spectroscopic data in papers where...

Cheminfo Retrieval Fifth Class FA09

submitted by: jcbradley
The fifth Chemical Information Retrieval class at Drexel University on October 22, 2009 started out with covering the new 3D structure viewer introduced recently at PLoS ONE to provide ideas for students doing a multimedia project this term. The current student answers to the chemistry publishing FAQ are then discussed. The reason for removing glatiramer acetate from ChemSpider is explained and a few databases (Wikipedia, PubChem, DrugBank) are visited that still contain the incorrect...

How it's Made: Toothpicks

submitted by: scivee-team

The process of turning raw wood into toothpics.From birch logs to the handy tool that helps you clean your teeth.

Ten Simple Rules for Getting Published

submitted by: Phil
he student council ( ) of the International Society for Computational Biology asked me to present my thoughts on getting published in the field of computational biology at the Intelligent Systems in Molecular Biology conference held in Detroit in late June of 2005. Close to 200 bright young souls (and a few not so young) crammed into a small room for what proved to be a wonderful interchange among a group of whom approximately one-half had yet to publish their first...
Authors: Philip e Bourne