New Ocean Acidification Study Shows Added Danger to Already Struggling Coral Reefs

submitted by: UMiami_RSMAS

A new study led by scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science suggests that over the next century recruitment of new corals could drop by 73 percent, as rising CO2 levels turn the oceans more acidic. The research findings reveal a new danger to the already threatened Caribbean and Florida reef Elkhorn corals.

Canary in a Coal Mine (MWV16)

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Coral reefs are dying a death of a thousand cuts and their disappearance threatens not only the incredibly diverse ecosystem that depends on them, but also human health and welfare. In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video marine scientists Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Ph.D. , chair of marine studies at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and Kiho Kim, Ph.D. , director of the environmental studies program at American University, explain the important relationship between microbes...

Save the Oysters - Introducing Non-native Species to the Chesapeake Bay

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Since the introduction of MSX and Dermo in the 1950’s, two infectious diseases that played a large role in the decline the Chesapeake Bay’s oyster population, several oyster hatcheries along the Eastern seaboard are working with scientists across many fields to develop innovative restoration programs. One idea is to introduce a non-native oyster from China called Crassostrea ariakensis. In this video podcast, MicrobeWorld talks about current research underway with C. ariakensis, the...

Save the Oysters

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Do you like oysters? Then join MicrobeWorld for a tour of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Horn Point Laboratory just outside of Cambridge, Md., on the Chesapeake Bay. In this video, MicrobeWorld looks at the impact of disease on the Bay’s oyster population and how scientists are using cultured algae to restore them. MicrobeWorld interviews Jamie King, Ph.D., NOAA Fisheries, Chesapeake Bay Office, David Nemazie, Marine Scientist, University of Maryland Center...