MWV Episode 33 - Food Safety 101

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Whether you are making lunch for work, school or a summer picnic, knowing what food to pack and how to prepare it can be the difference between enjoying your day or going home sick. From recent peanut butter and pistachio nut recalls to E. coli outbreaks associated with hamburger patties, people are increasingly concerned about the safety of the food they eat. Many illnesses can be prevented with proper food preparation and a clean kitchen. On this episode of MicrobeWorld Video, Chef Jim...

Tiny Conspiracies (MWV31)

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Bacteria communicate with chemical languages that allow them to synchronize their behavior and thereby act as multi-cellular organisms. This process, called quorum sensing, enables bacteria to do things they can’t do as a single cell, like successfully infect and cause disease in humans. Bonnie Bassler, Ph.D., the Squibb Professor of Molecular Biology at Princeton University and President-elect for the American Society for Microbiology, has been researching strategies that can interfere...

West Nile Virus MWV19

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
West Nile virus entered the United States in 1999 and is now considered a seasonal epidemic that starts in the summer and continues into the fall. First isolated in Uganda in 1937, the virus can cause severe human meningitis or encephalitis in 1% of those infected. In 2007 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reported 124 fatalities. The rapid spread of West Nile virus has put local and state mosquito surveillance programs on the front line of public health and disease preparedness. In...

Canary in a Coal Mine (MWV16)

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Coral reefs are dying a death of a thousand cuts and their disappearance threatens not only the incredibly diverse ecosystem that depends on them, but also human health and welfare. In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video marine scientists Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Ph.D. , chair of marine studies at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and Kiho Kim, Ph.D. , director of the environmental studies program at American University, explain the important relationship between microbes...

Modern Transportation and Infectious Disease – MWV15

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
From your local bus route to international air travel, infectious diseases can spread across the globe in a matter of hours. In this video podcast episode filmed at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Stephen Eubank from the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute of Virginia Tech and Daniel Lucey from Georgetown University discuss the role of transportation in the spread of disease and examine the effectiveness of various measures to curb transmission. Stephen Eubank, Ph.D., is a...

HIV/AIDS Education in America (MWV14)

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video we ask some leading researchers, education specialists, and public health officials about the state of HIV/AIDS education in America and ideas they have to support the teaching of microbial evolution using the latest HIV/AIDS research ó all while instilling innovative prevention strategies. Filmed at a forum for educators on February, 11, 2008 at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C. and at San Diego State University, this episode features...

Microbe Lab (MWV13)

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
MicrobeWorld visits the Marian Koshland Science Museum for “Microbe Lab,” a free day of activities for the general public. In this episode we interview Erika Shugart, deputy director of the Koshland Museum, about “Microbe Lab” and the Crack Koshie’s Curious Case: A Disease Detective Mission activity. Next, we talk with Nagla Fetouh, Education Program Manager for the Koshland Museum, who led a disease exchange activity that teaches people about ways to control the spread of...

Brian Malow - Live at the Koshland

submitted by: MicrobeWorld

MicrobeWorld and the Koshland Science Museum present a video podcast of comedian Brian Malow that includes excerpts from his science comedy act on infectious disease and an interview about the geek mystique of science.

Save the Oysters - Introducing Non-native Species to the Chesapeake Bay

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Since the introduction of MSX and Dermo in the 1950’s, two infectious diseases that played a large role in the decline the Chesapeake Bay’s oyster population, several oyster hatcheries along the Eastern seaboard are working with scientists across many fields to develop innovative restoration programs. One idea is to introduce a non-native oyster from China called Crassostrea ariakensis. In this video podcast, MicrobeWorld talks about current research underway with C. ariakensis, the...