MiniSymposium Bradley Lab 2011

submitted by: jcbradley

Jean-Claude Bradley presents a 15 minute summary of current research in his lab on September 29, 2011 at the Drexel University Department of Chemistry Faculty Mini-Symposium. The main project discussed is the Open Melting Point Collection done in collaboration with Andrew Lang and Antony Williams. Work by Evan Curtin is also shown, demonstrating the application of melting point and solubility in reaction design.

ChemInfo2011-class1

submitted by: jcbradley

Jean-Claude Bradley presents the introductory lecture for Chemical Information Retrieval at Drexel University for Fall 2011 on September 23, 2011. Examples are given to demonstrate how difficult it can be to find and assess chemical information such as melting points. An overview of the class wiki is then given.

Web 0.0/1.0/2.0/3.0 and Chemical Information

submitted by: jcbradley

Elizabeth Brown from the Binghamton University Libraries presents on "Web 0.0/1.0/2.0/3.0 and Chemical Information" on October 21, 2010 as a guest lecturer for Jean-Claude Bradley's class on Chemical Information Retrieval at Drexel University. An analogy to art is made to illustrate the differences between these communication platforms.

Beyond the PDF

submitted by: Phil

A brief description of a project for why and how we will begin to crowd source the electronic printing press of the 21st Century.

Introducing Sourcemap: the Open Source Platform for Sustainability and Supply Chain Transparency

submitted by: amerigo
How can we begin to make sustainable decisions without information about the products and services we buy? At Sourcemap, we believe you have a right to know where things come from and what they're made of. Sourcemap is a free and open platform for understanding the social and environmental impacts of modern supply chains. It is a rich social tool for crowd-sourcing information from producers, designers and consumers to build a comprehensive catalog of consumer products. Built-in...

open genius: strumento per una scienza libera

submitted by: atnp lab

In this presentation, Andrea Gaggioli describes crowd-funding as a possible strategy to cope with the lack of investments in research, as well as to increase democratization in the sciences. Projects seeking funding could be stored in an online repository. Each project would include a description of its objectives, duration, and requested contribution. Investors (either people or funding agencies) could decide which projects to fund.