Science Behind the News: Tornadoes

submitted by: nsf

Tornadoes are violent, twisting columns of air with wind speeds over 100 miles per hour that can tear communities apart. Josh Wurman, an atmospheric scientist, explains that tornadoes develop in a special type of thunderstorm called a supercell, but that there are still mysteries to unravel.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Perception of Danger in Tornado Alley

submitted by: nsf
Could lightening really strike twice? It often does in Tornado Alley, where storms wreak havoc and crush entire communities in minutes. But do people see it that way? After the 2006 Iowa City tornado, psychologist Jerry Suls and colleagues at the University of Iowa explored how Iowa City's residents perceived the risk of being hit by tornadoes in the future—perceptions that could have implications for disaster preparedness and response. Credit: Produced by Amina Khan, National Science...

Transforming the Sensing and Numerical Prediction of High Impact Local Weather Through Dynamic Adaptation

submitted by: apryl

Kelvin Droegemeier discusses the impact of technology on weather predictability and how cyberinfrastructure can facilitate more accurate predictability on a local level and improve the financial impact weather has on the economy. Originally posted by SDSC on SDSCs CI Channel at: www.cichannel.org