MWV Episode 43 - USA Science and Engineering Festival - Part 2

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
On October 23 2010, MicrobeWorld attended the first annual USA Science and Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. In part 2 of this two-part video, Stanley Maloy, Dean of the College of Science at San Diego State University, continues his tour of the microbiology related exhibits at the festival. Featured in this episode are members of the departments of biology and microbiology at the University of Georgia and Idaho State University. Maloy also introduces us to some...

Combining Agriculture with Microbial Genomics To Make Fuels

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Summary *Key challenges include dealing with diverse cellulosic sugars and finding ways to recycle carbon dioxide back into useful biomass. *Sugar cane and Hibiscus varieties from the Malvaceae plant family are sources of cellulosic biomass that do not require highly productive agricultural lands. *Microorganisms associated with termites and shipworms might harbor useful enzymes for processing biomass, while yeasts associated with Malvaceae plants are also worth investigating....
Authors: Nadathur Govind, Arup Sen

Metagenomic Comparison of the Microbial Hindgut Communities in Drywood- and Grass-Feeding Termites

submitted by: dougramsey
Falk Warnecke, Microbial Ecology Program, Joint Genome Institute, DOE Co-authors: Natalia Ivanova, Martin Allgaier, Nikos Kyrpides, Rudolf Scheffrahn, and Phil Hugenholtz Termites are highly efficient in degrading lignocellulosic biomass. In a recent metagenomic study we showed for the first time that microbes inhabiting the termite hindgut encode hundreds of carbohydrate-active enzymes, e.g. glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) and tens of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) and by implication are...

New Insights Into Lignocellulose Conversion by Termite Gut Microbes

submitted by: dougramsey

Termites and their complex hindgut microbiota are able to convert wood lignocellulose into hydrogen and other products used to fuel their metabolisms. Recent gene and genome and metagenome based analyses on the gut community have revealed novel insights into many bacteria-mediated, important symbiotic functions. The system-wide gene analysis of a microbial community specialized towards plant lignocellulose degradation has both basic and applied implications.