"Tipping the Sacred Cow: Thinking Beyond the Journal System" Herbert van de Sompel (Los Alamos National Laboratory)

submitted by: SWIB
Presentation slides (PDF) More than a decade after the emergence of electronic journals, the Web-based scholarly communication system still strongly resembles its paper-based predecessor. The growing frustration with this status-quo is illustrated by three prominent events in 2011 alone aimed at bringing together thought leaders to reflect on an improved scholarly communication system that better leverages the technical and social capabilities offered by the networked environment: the...

"The Open Citation Corpus and the SPAR Ontologies" David Shotton (University of Oxford)

submitted by: SWIB
Presentation slides (pptx) The Open Citations Corpus is a database of approx. 6.3 million biomedical literature citations, harvested from the reference lists of all open access articles in PubMed Central. These contain references to approx. 3.4 million papers, which represent ~20% of all PubMed-listed papers published between 1950 and 2010, including all the most highly cited papers in every biomedical field. The Open Citations Corpus web site allows you to browse these bibliographic...

Das LODUM Projekt: "Transparente Forschung auf Basis von Linked Library Data" Carsten Keßler (Universität Münster)

submitted by: SWIB
Präsentationsfolien (PDF) Das Linked Open Data University of Münster (LODUM) Projekt zielt auf die Verbesserung der Sichtbarkeit und Transparenz der Universität unter Nutzung von Semantic Web Technologien ab. Hauptziel ist die Verbesserung der Zugänglichkeit von Forschungsergebnissen (Publikationen, Forschungsdaten, Modellen, Methoden und Software), um transparente und reproduzierbare Forschung zu gewährleisten. Dieser Linked Science Ansatz setzt auf einen verbesserten Austausch von...

"What Needs to Happen in a Scholarly Publishing Reform?" Björn Brembs (FU Berlin)

submitted by: SWIB
Presentation slides (pptx) Scholarly publishing is fundamentally broken at essentially all levels starting with basic functionality and ranging to access, incentives, attribution, archiving, share/re-use and cost/benefit. What could be the feasible alternatives which would move scholarly publishing closer to a modern, IT-based system? A system which assists scientists in sorting, filtering and discovering relevant scientific findings? Which provides open access to tax-payer-funded...