Feature Based Terrain Modeling

submitted by: apryl

Author: Ali Charara, PhD Candidate
Supervisor: Alyn Rockwood, Professor of Applied Mathematics
Assisted by: Eduard Wisernig, Mousumi Pain

Molecular Visualization in CORNEA: Solar Cell & Chemical Science Data

submitted by: apryl

Solar Cell Data provided by: Dr. Michael McGehee, Stanford University & Dr. Aram Amassian, KAUST
Chemical Science Data provided by: Prof. Mohamed Eddaoudi, KAUST
This is a silent short clip intended for use at the KAUST SIGGRAPH booth in a series of video loops played during the convention.
Molecular Visualization in CORNEA: Solar Cell & Chemical Science Data
This is part of a series of short demo clips to be played in the KAUST SIGGRAPH booth.

Multi-language video playback using beam forming

submitted by: apryl
This is a multi-language audio demo used at the KAUST SIGGRAPH booth. For the full effect of the audio demonstration, this video was be available for preview in the KAUST booth at SIGGRAPH 2011. The demonstration used beam-forming to control the electroacoustic architecture of dialog in both english and arabic languages spatially in a designated area. Arabic listeners could stand a few feet away from english listeners and watch the same visuals comfortably without hearing the other...

Music and Your Brain

submitted by: apryl
KAUST Professor Pierre Magistretti, Dean of the Chemical, Life Sciences and Engineering (CLSE) Division discusses an experimental study of neural activity using electro-physical recordings of pianists with one objective to find patterns or clues to better understand synchrony and creativity. For the KAUST Winter Enrichment Program Class, Lab to Film: Story-telling in Science we created this video to test the student equipment and discover any technical challenges that participants would...

CPU vs GPU: AMBER Code Simulation

submitted by: btolo

The terminal view on the left shows a 'tail' of the AMBER code output for a simulation of Myoglobin, a protein found in muscle fibers. In this video, the output is being run on a single Intel E5462 2.80 GHz CPU. The terminal view on the right shows the same AMBER code output, but run on a single NVIDIA C1060 GPU. The GPU run is about 40 times faster than the CPU run.
Courtesy of Ross Walker, San Diego Supercomputer Center, UC San Diego.

CPU vs GPU: Protein Folding Simulation

submitted by: btolo

This simulation shows a protein folding simulation of TRPCage (an artificially designed protein) running in implicit solvent. The simulation shows a single Intel E5462 2.80GHz CPU versus an NVIDIA C1060 GPU.
Courtesy of Ross Walker, San Diego Supercomputer Center, UC San Diego.

Modeling Early Galaxies Using Radiation Hydrodynamics

submitted by: btolo
This simulation uses a flux-limited diffusion solver to explore the radiation hydrodynamics of early galaxies, in particular, the ionizing radiation created by Population III stars. At the time of this rendering, the simulation has evolved to a redshift of 3.5. The simulation volume is 11.2 comoving megaparsecs, and has a uniform grid of 1024^3 cells, with over 1 billion dark matter and star particles. The simulation was computed on resources of the National Institute for Computational...

San Diego Supercomputer Center Building Dedication Ceremony (part 7 of 7)

submitted by: btolo
With the press of a large 'I/O' button and strobe lights simulating a "powering up" sequence, officials of the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and University of California, San Diego ushered in the next era of data-intensive computing by dedicating a new, energy-efficient building extension as a key resource for UC San Diego and beyond. Part 7 of 7 - "Ribbon Cutting" SDSC Building Dedication Website

San Diego Supercomputer Center Building Dedication Ceremony (part 6 of 7)

submitted by: btolo

With the press of a large 'I/O' button and strobe lights simulating a "powering up" sequence, officials of the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and University of California, San Diego ushered in the next era of data-intensive computing by dedicating a new, energy-efficient building extension as a key resource for UC San Diego and beyond.

Part 6 of 7 - Frieder Seible

SDSC Building Dedication Website

San Diego Supercomputer Center Building Dedication Ceremony (part 5 of 7)

submitted by: btolo

With the press of a large 'I/O' button and strobe lights simulating a "powering up" sequence, officials of the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and University of California, San Diego ushered in the next era of data-intensive computing by dedicating a new, energy-efficient building extension as a key resource for UC San Diego and beyond.

Part 5 of 7 - Art Ellis

SDSC Building Dedication Website