How Harvester Ant Colonies use Interaction Networks to Regulate Foraging

submitted by: icamvid

How Harvester Ant Colonies use Interaction Networks to Regulate Foraging by Deborah Gordon, Stanford University, USA
Soft Active Materials
May 18, 2009 – May 21, 2009
Syracuse University, New York

Single Particle Plasmon Catalysis

submitted by: icamp2012school

Jennifer Dionne, Stanford University

Hybrid Tandem Solar Cells

submitted by: icamp2012school

Mike McGehee, Stanford University

Charge Generation and Transport Mechanisms I

submitted by: icamp2012school

Koen Vandewal, Stanford University

MICW - Single Cells and Metagenomes: Steve Quake

submitted by: JGI

Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

I-CAMP 2010 Australia CIMOPV Thursday July 1 Alberto Salleo Materials design to improve efficiency of OPV

submitted by: icamvid

I-CAMP 2010 Australia CIMOPV Thursday July 1 Alberto Salleo Materials design to improve efficiency of OPV
Parnell Building Rm 222, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
9:45am Thursday July 1, 2010

Polyketide Biosynthesis: The Erythromycin Example - Part 3: Enzymology of Erythromycin Polyketide Biosynthesis (42:11)

submitted by: video_collector

In the final part, the enzymology of the erythromycin polyketide synthase is discussed.

Polyketide Biosynthesis: The Erythromycin Example - Part 2: Impact of Genetics and Molecular Biology on Understanding and Engineering Erythromycin Biosynthesis (22:44)

submitted by: video_collector

In the second part, the contributions of genetics and molecular biology on investigations into erythromycin biosynthesis are summarized. The impact of these fields on biosynthetic engineering is also explained.

The Dynamic Bacterial Cell: Part 2: Escalating Infectious Disease Threat (39:37)

submitted by: video_collector
Many antibiotics, which we have taken foregranted since the 1950's, are now becoming ineffective because bacteria have developed ways of acquiring resistance. The development of new antibiotics is lagging behind the loss of the old ones in this race to combat infectious disease. Simultaneously, there is an increase in infectious diseases around the world due to over population, globalization and urbanization. This results in a lethal combination of emerging diseases and loss of effective...

Host-Pathogen Interaction and Human Disease: Part 2: Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Cancer (48:57)

submitted by: video_collector
Helicobacter pylori lives in the human stomach. It causes gastritis, ulcer disease and even gastric cancer. Some H. pylori can inject a protein, CagA, into gastric epithelial cells. CagA interacts with the tight junctions that bind cells together and with signaling molecules affecting motility and proliferation. CagA is associated with ulcer disease and cancer but we don't understand how it works to favor malignancy. Not long ago in history most humans carried H. pylori ; the incidence of...