SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: INTERNAL ATHLETE

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The United States hasn't won an Olympic medal in cross-country skiing since 1976, but in 2010, several skiers hope to change that. If they're successful, you can be certain it's due to their incredible endurance--cross-country skiers are among the fittest athletes in the world. Deborah King, an associate professor in the Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences at Ithaca College and Joseph Francisco, president of the American Chemical Society, look at the biochemistry of human endurance.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: FIGURING OUT FIGURE SKATING

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Every four years, we watch the stakes for Olympic figure skaters get higher, as they try to increase rotation in the air with their triple axels and quadruple toe loops. How do they do that? It's a scientific principle that we asked Olympic hopeful Rachael Flatt, and Deborah King, an associate professor in the Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences at Ithaca College, to help explain.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SCIENCE FRICTION

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Curling has been in the Winter Olympics for four years now, but it still seems a little strange to most of us. John Shuster, the captain--or "skip"--of the U.S. Curling Team in Vancouver, explains this unusual sport, and NSF-funded scientists Sam Colbeck, a retired scientist from the U.S. Army Cold Regions Lab and physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University explain the friction that makes it all work.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: BANKING ON SPEED

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The winter games in Vancouver provide a chance for the United States' four-man bobsled team to win its first gold medal in more than 60 years. And with the help of Paul Doherty, senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, Deborah King, associate professor in the Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences at Ithaca College, physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University, and bobsled designer Bob Cuneo, the team explains how they hope to accomplish this feat.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: DOWNHILL SCIENCE

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In February, Olympic skiers such as Julia Mancuso, Ted Ligety, Marco Sullivan and Scott Macartney will race down Vancouver's Whistler Mountain at speeds of up to 90 miles an hour. Paul Doherty, senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, and Sam Colbeck, a retired scientist from the U.S. Army Cold Regions lab, explain the physics of this downhill thrill ride.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: AERIAL PHYSICS

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In the sport of freestyle aerials, skiers are judged on their ability to perform complex jumps in the air. Emily Cook, a 12-year veteran of the U.S. Freestyle team, and Paul Doherty, a Senior Scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, show how these jumps actually come from three basic twisting techniques that you can try in your own classroom.

European Research for diabetes patients

submitted by: COMED2010

The prevalences of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and the metablic syndrome are rising rapidly both in Europe and worldwide. There is evidence that this is due to the population taking less exercise and becoming more sedentary, coupled with the increased consumption of high fat, low fibre foods (fast food or convenience food). The EXGENESIS consortium aims to provide insights into the reasons why poor diet and lack of exercise contribute to increasing levels of obesity and diabetes.