Video Tip of the Week: ScienceSeeker for science blogging

submitted by: OpenHelix

Learn how you can join the ScienceSeeker blog network to communicate about science, including special ways to highlight posts you've done on peer-reviewed publications. More details here: http://blog.openhelix.eu/?p=12676

Science Nation - Trading Textbooks for Twitter

submitted by: nsf
These college students are supposed to use their phones in class! "So (class), let's turn to Twitter." Think of it as Twitter 101, a class in, of all things, social media. Not just tweeting, but Facebook, blogging, wikis and the like. Gerald Kane, assistant professor of information systems at the Carroll School of Management, created and teaches the course at Boston College. For this and more Science Nation, please go to:http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Introducing Sourcemap: the Open Source Platform for Sustainability and Supply Chain Transparency

submitted by: amerigo
How can we begin to make sustainable decisions without information about the products and services we buy? At Sourcemap, we believe you have a right to know where things come from and what they're made of. Sourcemap is a free and open platform for understanding the social and environmental impacts of modern supply chains. It is a rich social tool for crowd-sourcing information from producers, designers and consumers to build a comprehensive catalog of consumer products. Built-in...

Science & Social Media: Chris Condayan, ASM/MicrobeWorld

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
On Jan. 6, 2009, in Arlington, Virginia, the National Science Foundation, The Ballston Science and Technology Alliance, and BioInformatics, LLC, hosted a Cafe Scientifique on Science and Social Media. In part 2 of this 4 part video, Chris Condayan, Manager of Public Outreach for the American Society of Microbiology, shares some examples of new media in action in both communications between scientists as well as with the public at large. Condayan has written extensively on the subject of new...

open genius: strumento per una scienza libera

submitted by: atnp lab

In this presentation, Andrea Gaggioli describes crowd-funding as a possible strategy to cope with the lack of investments in research, as well as to increase democratization in the sciences. Projects seeking funding could be stored in an online repository. Each project would include a description of its objectives, duration, and requested contribution. Investors (either people or funding agencies) could decide which projects to fund.