Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Injury and Recovery

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Biomedical engineer Cato Laurencin, at the University of Connecticut Health Center, describes his pioneering work in tissue regeneration, a field of research that could help athletes recover faster from knee ligament damage, the same injury that will cause alpine ski racer Lindsey Vonn to miss the Sochi Olympics.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

Science of the Winter Olympic Games: Physics of Slope-Style Skiing

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Slope-style skiing is a gravity defying freestyle skiing event debuting in Sochi. Nick Goepper, a 2013 world champion, will need to follow the laws of physics and rotational motion in order to nail his tricks in his quest for Olympic gold.

Provided by the National Science Foundation & NBC Learn

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SCIENCE OF SKIS

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In skiing events like the downhill, slalom or ski jump it's often the skis that are bound to an athlete's feet--and the materials used to make them--that give these athletes an edge over the competition. U.S. Ski Team members Julia Mancuso, Ted Ligety and Scott Macartney, and Katharine Flores, an associate professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Ohio State University, explain how the materials used to make skis play a vital role in their performance on the...

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: DOWNHILL SCIENCE

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In February, Olympic skiers such as Julia Mancuso, Ted Ligety, Marco Sullivan and Scott Macartney will race down Vancouver's Whistler Mountain at speeds of up to 90 miles an hour. Paul Doherty, senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, and Sam Colbeck, a retired scientist from the U.S. Army Cold Regions lab, explain the physics of this downhill thrill ride.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: AERIAL PHYSICS

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In the sport of freestyle aerials, skiers are judged on their ability to perform complex jumps in the air. Emily Cook, a 12-year veteran of the U.S. Freestyle team, and Paul Doherty, a Senior Scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, show how these jumps actually come from three basic twisting techniques that you can try in your own classroom.