How tiger sharks affect Shark Bay’s ecosystem

submitted by: nsf

For the last two decades, Michael Heithaus has been studying how tiger sharks affect one particular ecosystem – Shark Bay, Australia, one of the world’s most pristine seagrass ecosystems. The Florida International University biologist explains how his team studies these top predators and their prey, and why tiger sharks are so important to the health of Shark Bay.

Taking the Temperature of ancient Organisms

submitted by: UMiami_RSMAS

UM Rosenstiel School professor Peter Swart talks about the the Rosenstiel School's acquisition of two new stable isotope mass spectrometers that allow for Clumping, which is the process of directly measuring rare isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Clumping allows scientists to directly measure the temperatures of organisms, such as dinosaurs or those located in ancient seas.

Biomimicry makes Science Cool

submitted by: NatureSweetheart

Biomimicry is the science of looking at nature for solutions to problems and inspiration for inventions. A 7 year old, passionate about nature, animals and space, shares a few fun facts about biomimicry.