Science Nation - Follow the Water

submitted by: nsf
Already parts of the world suffer from lack of water, and with increasing demand it's expected to get worse. To better understand and predict drought, 30 universities are collaborating in a multi-disciplinary effort called the Shale Hills Project. Among the studies, is field research following the life cycle of water along the Susquehanna River Basin, the main tributary to the Chesapeake Bay. With support from the National Science Foundation, civil engineer Chris Duffy and his team at Penn...

SDSU Geological Sciences Webinar - Kathleen R. Johnson

submitted by: tcarrasc
Reconstructing Asian Monsoon History from Chinese Speleothems; Kathleen R. Johnson, Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine: While we know that modern anthropogenic climate change is superimposed upon significant natural climate variability, the instrumental record of climate is too short to capture the full range of this variability. In order to fully understand and predict future changes, therefore, high-resolution, welldated paleoclimate records are needed to...