San Diego Science Festival -- Lunch with a Laureate -- Dr. Kurt Withrich

submitted by: sdscienccefestival

Nobel Laureate Kurt Wuthrich joins students of High Tech High - Chula Vista in an informal Q&A.

Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

submitted by: alex01

J. Kocsis, PhD. - The current approaches to the therapy of multiple sclerosis are reviewed by J. Kocsis (Yale University). His research emphasizes remyelination as an approach to the therapy of multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury.

Drug Discovery for Alzheimer's Disease

submitted by: alex01

Gregory Rose from PharmExperts.com interviews J. Buccafusco (Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA) about his development of new anti-Altzheimer drugs, designed to act by multiple mechanisms to improve congnition. Desensitization of nicotinic receptors is one of the novel approaches proposed by Buccafusco. Three of his compounds are currently in advanced preclinical evaluation.

The Past, Present and Future of the Protein Data Bank

submitted by: WomenInBioinformatics

Dr. Helen M. Berman, Director of the Protein Database (PDB), Rutgers University.

Dr. Berman is internationally renowned for her development of protein and nucleic acid databases. Her research interest is in the application of Bioinformatics to protein structure.

Biology of Plants

submitted by: scivee-team

An overview of the process of photosynthesis and the biology of plants - function, reproduction and life.

Multipolar representation of protein structure

linked profile(s): Phil
submitted by: jmath
Background That the structure determines the function of proteins is a central paradigm in biology. However, protein functions are more directly related to cooperative effects at the residue and multi-residue scales. As such, current representations based on atomic coordinates can be considered inadequate. Bridging the gap between atomic-level structure and overall protein-level functionality requires parameterizations of the protein structure (and other...
Authors: Apostol Gramada, Philip e Bourne

Protein Synthesis

submitted by: jmath

A demosntration of Protein synthesis expressed through dance. The film was directed in 1971 by Robert Alan Weiss for the Department of Chemistry of Stanford University and narrated by Paul Berg, a 1980 Nobel Prize winner for Chemistry. It is imprinted with the "free love" aura of the period, and continues to be shown in biology classes today. It has inspired a series of similar funny attempts at vulgarizing protein synthesis.

Wiggle—Predicting Functionally Flexible Regions from Primary Sequence

submitted by: jgu
The Wiggle series are support vector machine–based predictors that identify regions of functional flexibility using only protein sequence information. Functionally flexible regions are defined as regions that can adopt different conformational states and are assumed to be necessary for bioactivity. Many advances have been made in understanding the relationship between protein sequence and structure. This work contributes to those efforts by making strides to understand the relationship...
Authors: Jenny Gu, Michael Gribskov, Philip E Bourne

Structural Evolution of the Protein Kinase–Like Superfamily

linked profile(s): Phil
submitted by: escheeff
The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase–like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a “universal core” domain consisting only of...
Authors: Eric d Scheeff, Philip e Bourne