Role of the Neural Crest in Vertebrate Development and Evolution: Part 3: The Molecular Control of the Neural Crest Contribution to Craniofacial and Brain Development (36:10)

submitted by: video_collector
Further studies have shown that the NC cells which participate in facial skeletogenesis correspond to the anteriormost region of the body axis where the genes of the Hox cluster are not expressed. If the forced expression of Hoxa2, Hoxa3 and Hoxb4 (the most anteriorly expressed Hox genes) is induced in this part of the neural fold, brain development is deeply affected with anencephaly and no skeletogenesis takes place in the face which fails to develop. This phenotype is reproduced when the...

Metabonomic profiling of the gut microbiome: Implications for human health James Kinross, Imperial College, London

submitted by: dougramsey
Microbial-mammalian metabolic cooperation is defined as the human ‘metabonome’. Transgenomic co-metabolic interactions within the metabonome greatly increase system complexity and this presents a significant challenge for elucidating the mechanisms by which the intestinal micro biome influences the host phenotype. By measuring and mathematically modelling changes in the levels of products of metabolism found in mammalian biological fluids and tissues, metabonomics offers fresh insight...

A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) and the Search for the Dark Matter of the Biological Universe

submitted by: dougramsey
There is a glaring gap in microbial genome sequence availability – the currently available genome sequences show a highly biased phylogenetic distribution compared to the extent of microbial diversity known today. This bias has resulted in major limitations in our knowledge of microbial genome complexity and our understanding of the evolution, physiology and metabolic capacity of microbes. Although there have been small efforts in sequencing genomes from across the tree of life for...

Array CGH Computational Lab - Chris Miller

submitted by: ralanharris

An introduction to computational methods for analyzing Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization data by Chris Miller. This was presented as a lab within the Computer Aided Discovery Methods course offered within the Graduate Program at Baylor College of Medicine.