Science Nation - The Music Man

submitted by: nsf
These engineers and musicians are hitting just the right notes An engineer with a love of music, and a musician who likes technology, Mark Bocko and Dave Headlam are both professors at the University of Rochester. For more than ten years their collaboration has been moving both fields forward. For more Science Nation, go to: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Body Rhythms and Breast Cancer

submitted by: nsf
Could working the night shift alter a woman's body clock enough to cause breast cancer? "One minute you're a healthy person, the next minute you have breast cancer." Ettamay (last name withheld) is up early these days. She lives a much different life than she did when she was a nurse working the night shifts. She would be just getting to sleep at this early morning hour. "I was always exhausted," she says. "I don't know any of the nurses, especially the night shift gals, that weren't...

Science Nation - Fluorescent Fruit Flies Shed New Light

submitted by: nsf

Researchers genetically engineer glow-in-the-dark sperm in fruit flies, revealing much more about sexual selection.
For more Science Nation, go to http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Acrobatic Robots

submitted by: nsf
Dennis Hong is living his dreams ... literally ... in a lab filled with wacky robots "When I was seven years old, I watched the film 'Star Wars' for the very first time. It just completely blew my mind. All the robots and spaceships," recalls Dennis Hong. You never know where you will find inspiration! For Hong, a mechanical engineer, it was there, on the silver screen. For more Science Nation, go to http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Black Holes

submitted by: nsf
Astronomers use infrared "eyes" to shed light on these enigmatic cosmic structures A new infrared image has captured the center of our galaxy in never-before-seen detail--showing stars and gas swirling into the super massive black hole that lurks at the heart of our own Milky Way. For this and more Science Nation, go to http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Good Vibrations

submitted by: nsf
Treating brain disease with some good vibes Columbia University bioengineer Elisa Konofagou is making waves when it comes to researching treatments for degenerative brain disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. These aren't just any waves; they're ultrasound waves. "Ultrasound denotes acoustic wave propagation. If you increase the intensity and pressure of these waves, you can cause biological effects on tissues," says Konofagou. For this and more Science Nation, go to...

Science Nation - Lice and Human Migration

submitted by: nsf
Paleo-anthropologists believe Homo sapiens evolved in Africa 100 -- 200,000 years ago, and eventually moved out of Africa to populate the globe. But, how can researchers trace the specifics of that human migration? With support from the National Science Foundation, Florida Museum of Natural History Mammologist David Reed has undertaken a novel approach. He studies the genetic diversity and evolution of the human parasite that hitched a ride the whole way: lice. He gathers samples from around...

Science Nation - Green Roofs

submitted by: nsf
Ingenuity sprouting from the rooftops The rooftops of Manhattan are as varied as the city itself. A glance at the city skyline reveals a myriad of shapes and colors. Look a little closer and the shapes reveal themselves to be the things we often see rooted on Manhattan buildings, such as water towers, ventilation systems and communications equipment. But, on a few rooftops, something else is taking root--literally. For this and more Science Nation, go to...

Science Nation - Dying Lobsters

submitted by: nsf
Researcher narrows down spread of first lobster virus From the Florida Keys to Cuba to the Bahamas and Belize, tourists and locals enjoy the taste of the Caribbean spiny lobster. Family operations and commercial fisheries alike depend on its popularity, so the lobster is important to many local economies. But this crustacean is threatened by a virus called Panulirus argus virus 1 (PaV1). For more Science Nation, go to -...

Science Nation - Creeping Crawling Caterpillars

submitted by: nsf
Roly-Poly role models for future robots Sometimes it pays to be spineless. Take the caterpillar--it can squirm and crawl in ways that would make a contortionist green with envy. One such animal, a green tobacco hornworm, dangles off Barry Trimmer's finger, half of its body squirming and bending in mid-air. What fascinates Trimmer, a Tufts University biology professor, is how caterpillars can move in ways animals with spines and skeletons can't. For this and more Science Nation, go to...