Science Nation - Babies and Learning

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Are we pre-wired to know right from wrong or are we blank slates who learn solely by our exposure to the environment? The question isn't new, but by studying the behavior of newborns, psychologist Karen Wynn of Yale University believes she can get us closer to the answer. With support from the National Science Foundation, she is investigating the role an infant's social preferences play in how they learn from other people. Wynn and her team put on puppet shows for infants, with characters...

Science Nation - Ticket to Ride

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The National Science Foundation (NSF) has featured Professor Andrew Sweeting in a new video story in its online magazine Science Nation. Sweeting specializes in industrial organization and one line of his research focuses on perishable good markets. In the story "Ticket to Ride," Sweeting's work on price dynamics for sporting tickets is explained, using the example of Duke basketball tickets. Visit NSF's Science Nation web page:...

Science Nation - Robotic Arms

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Who do you call if you need a little help with some of life's more complicated tasks...like building a car, performing surgery, or even diffusing a bomb? The people at Barrett Technologies in Cambridge, Massachusetts are always glad to lend a hand, or an arm, or both, as long as they're robotic. Barrett Technologies is on the cutting edge of developing and implementing robotic technology. We'll head to Cambridge to rub elbows with some of the company's creations, and see how support from the...

Science Nation - Bonobos and Chimpanzees

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With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), anthropologist Brian Hare and his wife and colleague Vanessa Woods study bonobo behavior, investigating how bonobos differ from chimpanzees, and how bonobos might provide insight on the origins of cooperation in human society. For more Science Nation, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Glowing Squid

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The Hawaiian bobtail squid is a master of camouflage, even using luminous bacteria as part of its nighttime disguise. For more cool squid science, visit the Glowing Squid page on Science Nation: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/glowingsquid.jsp For more Science Nation episodes, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/

Science Nation - Sleep Deprived Kids

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Getting enough shut-eye really matters for children, and those who are poor need it the most - We all know kids, especially, need a good night's sleep in order to thrive. After studying thousands of children, psychologist Mona El-Sheikh, a professor of child development, says children who don't get enough shut-eye suffer serious consequences. For more on this topic and more Science Nation reports, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Leaf Cutter Ants

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Farmers, pharmacists and energy experts! Leaf-cutter ants put on quite a show. In established colonies, millions of "workers" cut and carry sections of leaves larger than their own bodies as part of a well choreographed, highly functioning society. For more Science Nation visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Mount St. Helens

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Life erupts once again from the once lifeless mountain. When Mount St. Helens blew its top in 1980, it wasn't a surprise that it happened, but even today the extent of the damage is hard to fathom. The eruption knocked down 100-foot trees like matchsticks and killed just about everything in its path. There have been several smaller eruptions since then, but nothing like what happened in 1980. For this and more Science Nation, go to...

Science Nation - IceCube

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- Searching below the surface of Antarctica for the mysterious neutrino - There's nothing like temperatures that can reach minus 100 degrees Fahrenheit to keep you on your toes. For engineers Erik Verhagen and Camille Parisel, working in Antarctica on a project appropriately called "IceCube" is both challenging and exciting. For more visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/icecube.jsp

Science Nation - Science Behind Bars

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- Unlocking the mysteries of science in the unlikeliest of places - You never know where you might find some intrepid scientists trying to unlock some of nature's mysteries. Forest ecologist Nalini Nadkarni came up with an idea that brings science to a most unlikely place--prison! For this and more Science Nation, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/