Solving blood clots with integrative STEM lessons

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The Mobile Area Education Foundation is designing lessons to teach kids that engineering and math can solve real-world problems…like designing ways to catch blood clots in a model human circulatory system.

Hydrokinetic energy to power our future

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Researchers at the University of Minnesota taught kids the science behind hydrokinetic energy at the USA Science and Engineering Festival.

Spend a Day in a Spider's Shoes

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Jonathan Pruitt of the University of Pittsburgh shows kids just how hard it is to be a spider due to their poor vision. Explore the behavior, ecology and sensory systems of spiders, ubiquitous and one of the most diverse groups of organisms in the world.

Restoring the Mississippi River Delta

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Learn how experiments and computer models can help harness energy and restore free-flowing rivers. Assess the challenges and benefits of restoring lost wetlands in the Mississippi Delta.

A thought requires roughly a million different brain neurons

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Theoretical biophysicist William Bialek discusses how all of the parts in our brain work together to produce all of the simple and complex thoughts that humans have.

Observing multiple neurons simultaneously

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Theoretical biophysicist William Bialek discusses the BRAIN Initiative and how his team plans to study neuron activity.

How does our brain use coding to interpret the world?

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Theoretical biophysicist William Bialek discusses how our brain interprets information in a continuous way.

Genetic engineering and the production of molecules

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Theoretical biophysicist William Bialek discusses genetic engineering and how the placement of instructions for a gene alters an organism.

Optogenetics relies on biodiversity

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How two unlikely microbes (that don’t even have brains) led to the development of one of today’s most promising brain research techniques—which is being used to study many diseases including schizophrenia and Parkinson’s.

Nobel Prize winning astrophysicist Adam Riess discusses supernovae

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Nobel Prize winning astrophysicist Adam Riess answers questions about his research on supernovae and his life outside the lab.