Science Nation - Evolution in Action

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Professor Lawrence Gilbert and his team at the University of Texas at Austin have discovered a population of tropical butterflies that exemplify "evolution in action," and a rare research opportunity. Gilbert says they may be witnessing a species of butterfly splitting into two different species. For more information and more ScienceNation videos, go to http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Spray-On Solar

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Have you seen those big, bulky, breakable photovoltaic cells that now collect the sun's rays? Well, what if solar energy could be harnessed using tiny collectors that could be spray painted on a roof, a wall or even a window? Find out more on this episode of Science Nation. For more Science Nation episodes, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Orangutan Copycats

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How smart are copy cats? Maybe it depends on your species You know the saying "monkey see, monkey do?" How about "orangutan see, orangutan do?" If that holds true, the small orangutan peering over his mother's shoulder in an enclosure at Zoo Atlanta should learn how to get a tasty treat just by watching how she gets one. For more information and more ScienceNation videos, go to http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - DigiMorph

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Cutting edge research without having to cut up anything! For hundreds of years, scientists who wanted to examine a rare fossil might have had to travel halfway around the world. And that is not the only challenge when viewing a small, unique or priceless specimen. Now a new range of tools provides a chance for researchers anywhere in the world to see a one-of-a-kind specimen, with no fear of damaging it. For more Science Nation visit:...

Science Nation - Virtual Self

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An avatar is a virtual representation of ourselves in the digital world, but it can also affect our real-world self. Watch how in this episode of Science Nation.

For more Science Nation visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Disappearing Red Shrimp

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These legendary creatures may have something to teach us about survival, even as the clock is ticking on their habitats.

For more information and more ScienceNation videos, go to http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Virtual Reality Maps

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- Rebuilding the world one pixel at a time - Who says Rome wasn't built in a day? With the muscle of about 500 computers and 150,000 still images, Steve Seitz, a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington's Seattle campus, and his colleagues have reconstructed many of Rome's famous landmarks in just 21 hours. For more Science Nation, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Fascinating Flight

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Using wind tunnels, lasers and high-speed cameras, University of Montana researcher Ken Dial studies ground birds for clues about the origins and mechanics of flight.

For more Science Nation, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp

Science Nation - Sounds of Survival

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They are quiet as church mice ... or are they? See how eavesdropping on mice provides clues about how humans process sound.

Science Nation - Solar Decathlon

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Teams design and build homes powered by the sun This past October, taking a walk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., might have been more like taking a walk into the future. Twenty solar-powered homes were sprawled across the mall's west end, transforming it from a park into something that resembled an innovative new housing development. Park purists take note: the transformation was only temporary. The homes were part of a competition. "The Solar Decathlon is a competition for...