Hans Hofmann explains how environment and genetics influence the brains and behavior of cichlid fish

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Hans Hofmann of the University of Texas, Austin, is researching the influences of environment and genetics on the brains and behavior of cichlid fish. Cichlids provide excellent model organisms for such studies because thousands of species of cichlids have evolved; many of these species are genetically similar but behaviorally and socially different from one another. Hofmann is using the diversity of cichlid species to help identify which genes regulate various behaviors and evaluate how...

Melina Hale explains how her research of zebrafish is helping to advance brain research

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Melina Hale of the University of Chicago is studying neuronal circuits in zebrafish that generate startle responses. Because little is known about how circuits operate in any organism and because startle responses are controlled by relatively simple circuits, an improved understanding of the circuitry of the zebrafish's startle responses is expected to help lay the groundwork for research on more complicated circuits.

Clifton Ragsdale reveals why octopuses are such successful predators

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Clifton Ragsdale of the University of Chicago is researching the nervous system of the octopus, which is a successful predator partly because it has excellent eyesight--the best of any invertebrate. The octopus's excellent eyesight enables it to visually zero in and focus on prey.

Partha Mitra explains his mouse brain research

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Partha Mitra of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is currently focused on the Mouse Brain Architecture Project (MAP), which is aimed at creating 3-D maps of the mouse brain at various scales.

West Virginia chemical spill studied by environmental engineers

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A chemical spill near Charleston, West Virginia prompted officials to advise about 15 percent of the state's residents to not use the water. In the aftermath, a West Virginia University environmental engineer and her team rushed to the site to collect samples by the Elk River for further analysis. For more information visit: http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=130304&org=NSF&from=news

Novel cell-based and materials science approach to target Glioblastoma brain cancer tumors

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Stefan Bossmann and Deryl Troyer at Kansas State University are developing a novel materials treatment method for persons with brain cancer that uses a type of white blood cell to deliver anticancer drugs to particularly virulent brain tumors.

New Species of Sea Anemone Discovered by NSF Scientists in Antarctica

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During a routine test of an underwater robot, NSF scientists from University of Nebraska-Lincoln made a startling discovery...an entirely new species of sea anemone living inside the ice. For more information, visit http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=130117&org=NSF&from=news

CES 2014: Barobo robots teach children algebra

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At the Consumer Electronics Show, CES 14, Barobo, Inc. showed the NSF their robot that helps teach children algebra in a completely new way. By taking algebra off the page and into the physical world, Barobo aims to inspire a new generation of mathematicians.

CES 2014: Innovega's wearable electronics allows users to see objects up close

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At the Consumer Electronics Show, CES 14, Innovega gave the National Science Foundation a demo of their contact lens, glasses technology that allows users to view things far in the distance and right in front of their face.

CES 2014: Rehabtek changes medical rehab methods

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At the Consumer Electronics Show, Rehabtek is shaking up the medical rehab industry with robotics like their ankle model designed to help children with it's interactive games.

Rehabtek is one of nearly 30 exhibitors funded by NSF this week at Eureka Park, which features new grassroots technology.

Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ZPvk