Nolan Ryan, Eddie Fisher, and Science Communication - Scientists & Engineers on Sofas

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Laurie Howell of the NSF sits down with Dr. Moira Gunn in this episode of Scientists & Engineers on Sofas (and other furnishings). Dr. Gunn is an engineer and science communicator, hosting the popular TechNation radio show.

Credit: National Science Foundation

TNsfZ Exclusive! Big Bite taken out of Big Apple

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TNsfZ has unearthed "groundbreaking" research about ants in Manhattan - here's what we caught on camera!

Every year they remove tons of refuse from New York City streets and help keep down the rat population. See what researchers have learned about NYC's creepy, crawly clean-up crew.

2015 Vannevar Bush award winner James Duderstadt

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James Duderstadt has always considered himself a change agent. It might sound odd, when you consider that he’s spent nearly 50 years at one institution. Look a bit closer, however, and you quickly see what he means: Duderstadt, a engineer by training, has spent his career pushing for innovations in higher education and research, and remains a vocal leader in science policy. Duderstadt is president emeritus and University Professor of science and engineering at the University of Michigan....

How reliable is eyewitness testimony?

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Eyewitness testimony -- it's often thought of as solid evidence in criminal cases, but researchers including Iowa State University's Gary Wells have found that our memories aren't as reliable as we think. Sometimes, we can even build false recollections about people we only think we saw.

Dr. Wells' wesbite: http://wells.socialpsychology.org/

Scientists peers into the heart of a nighttime thunderstorm

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The heart of a nighttime thunderstorm, and new insights into how these storms form, revealed by Ed Bensman of the National Science Foundation. For more information: http://nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_summ.jsp?cntn_id=135631&org=NSF&from=new... Credit: National Science Foundation

How well can you focus your brain?

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Seven digits is the "magic number" for neuroscientists. It's just about the maximum your short-term memory can retain. Can you remember a seven-digit number? Find out with Barbara Shinn-Cunningham, head of the NSF-funded CELEST Science of Learning Center at Boston University​. Shinn-Cunningham and other leaders from the Science of Learning Centers provided a Capitol Hill briefing June 24, 2015 on their work studying how the brain learns and develops. Rep. Chaka Fattah hosted the...

Collaboratively Exploring Virtual Worlds: Beyond Today’s Internet

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The Mars Rover game introduces educational content in a fun and rewarding 3D gaming experience. Students must work together to solve puzzles as they learn to navigate a damaged rover across the surface of the red planet. Along the way, they learn programming and math.   The Pentagon’s Office of Training and Readiness Strategy’s Advanced Distributed Learning laboratory worked with Lockheed Martin’s Mission Systems and Training and US Ignite to create a platform for distributed,...

Searching for Answers: Mysteries of the Brain

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For more than a century, scientists have studied the brain, and yet there is still so much about it that remains a mystery. New research is underway to develop and use cutting-edge technologies, and scientists across disciplines are working together to better understand the brain and how it works. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.

Brain-Computer Interface: Mysteries of the Brain

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Neuroengineer Rajesh Rao of the University of Washington is developing brain-computer interfaces, devices that can monitor and extract brain activity to enable a machine or computer to accomplish tasks, from playing video games to controlling a prosthetic arm. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.

Perceiving Brain: Mysteries of the Brain

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Sabine Kastner, a professor of neuroscience and psychology at Princeton University, is studying how the brain determines what information is most important in everyday scenes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, Kastner is able to peek inside the brain and see what areas are active when a person sees a face, place or object. "Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.