United to End Cancer

submitted by: mdanderson

There are those who stand together to make a difference in the fight against cancer — The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s community of donors. From across the world and all walks of life, these diverse supporters are united in their generosity toward the Moon Shots Program, the most ambitious assault on cancer ever undertaken by a single institution.

For more information and to make a donation, visit: mdanderson.org/gifts

Melanoma Moon Shot Annual Report 2013

submitted by: mdanderson
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in September 2012 launched its Moon Shots Program, an ambitious and comprehensive action plan to dramatically accelerate the pace of converting scientific discoveries into clinical advances that reduce cancer deaths. Initial moon shot cancers are breast and ovarian; acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes; chronic lymphocytic leukemia; lung; melanoma and prostate cancer. Jeffrey Gershenwald, M.D., professor in MD Anderson's...

AML and MDS Moon Shot Annual Report 2013

submitted by: mdanderson
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in September 2012 launched its Moon Shots Program, an ambitious and comprehensive action plan to dramatically accelerate the pace of converting scientific discoveries into clinical advances that reduce cancer deaths. Initial moon shot cancers are breast and ovarian; acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes; chronic lymphocytic leukemia; lung; melanoma and prostate cancer. Guillermo Garcia-Manero, M.D., professor in MD Anderson's...

Prostate Cancer Moon Shot Annual Report 2013

submitted by: mdanderson
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in September 2012 launched its Moon Shots Program, an ambitious and comprehensive action plan to dramatically accelerate the pace of converting scientific discoveries into clinical advances that reduce cancer deaths. Initial moon shot cancers are breast and ovarian; acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes; chronic lymphocytic leukemia; lung; melanoma and prostate cancer. Christopher Logothetis, M.D., chair and professor,...

Facts about myelodysplastic syndrome

submitted by: mdanderson
Around 15,000 people in the United States are diagnosed each year with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). MDS occurs when the bone marrow does not properly produce one or more of the following: red blood cells, white blood cells and/or platelets. In the past it was thought MDS was only deadly when it developed into acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), but current research shows MDS can be fatal without reaching the stage of AML. Guillermo Garcia-Manero, M.D., professor in Leukemia, explains the...