SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SLAPSHOT PHYSICS

submitted by: nsf

One of the most popular team sports in the Winter Olympics is hockey. More than just a physical game, for scientists, it's a showcase for physics on ice--especially when it comes to the slapshot. Three-time Olympian Julie Chu, Thomas Humphrey, a senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, and Katharine Flores, an associate professor in the department of materials science and engineering at Ohio State University, break down the science of hockey's hardest shot.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SCIENCE FRICTION

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Curling has been in the Winter Olympics for four years now, but it still seems a little strange to most of us. John Shuster, the captain--or "skip"--of the U.S. Curling Team in Vancouver, explains this unusual sport, and NSF-funded scientists Sam Colbeck, a retired scientist from the U.S. Army Cold Regions Lab and physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University explain the friction that makes it all work.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: BANKING ON SPEED

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The winter games in Vancouver provide a chance for the United States' four-man bobsled team to win its first gold medal in more than 60 years. And with the help of Paul Doherty, senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, Deborah King, associate professor in the Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences at Ithaca College, physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University, and bobsled designer Bob Cuneo, the team explains how they hope to accomplish this feat.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: TURNING

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Anyone can go fast straight: The challenge is turning. It takes more than ten thousand pounds of force to get a racecar around Turn 3 at Texas Motor Speedway at 180 mph. All that force comes from four tiny patches of rubber--the only thing keeping the car on the track and out of the wall.

Science of NFL Football - Newton's Third Law of Motion

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"Science of NFL Football" is a 10-part video series funded by the National Science Foundation and produced in partnership with the National Football League. In this segment, NBC's Lester Holt breaks down Isaac Newton's Third Law of Motion and how energy transfers between football players who collide during a game. Professors Tony Schmitz of the University of Florida and Jim Gates of the University of Maryland explain why momentum can keep a player moving or stop them in their tracks.

Continuation angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and the study of the high T c superconductors

submitted by: icamvid

Juan Campuzano discusses pseudogap, superconductors, and temperature. He also mentions ground state, momentum dependence, and how to know the q's origin.