Host-Pathogen Interaction and Human Disease: Part 1: What is a Pathogen? Trying to Understand Human Biology by the Study of Pathogenic Bacteria (37:48)

submitted by: video_collector
Ninety percent of the cells humans carry are microbes. Only a few of the bacteria we encounter are pathogenic and can cause disease. Pathogens possess the inherent ability to cross anatomic barriers or breach other host defenses that limit the microbes that make up our normal flora. A significant part of human evolution has gone into developing ways to thwart microbial intrusion. In turn, microbes have come up with clever ways to avoid and circumvent host defenses but human — microbe...

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 3 of 3) MWV23

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
In the final episode of this 3 part video series on how to optimize antibiotic use and minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens, Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, goes in depth on the use of antimicrobial drugs in agriculture, their efficacy, and adverse human health consequences. Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine, discusses policy, regulatory and...

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 2 of 3) MWV

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
On September 18, 2008 at the Koshland Science Museum in Washington, D.C., Dr. Stuart Levy, professor of Molecular Biology and Microbiology at Tufts University School of Medicine and Dr. Linda Tollefson, Assistant Commissioner for Science at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, discussed how to optimize antibiotic use and how to minimize the emergence of drug resistant pathogens. In part 2 of this 3 part video series, Dr. Levy discusses how antibiotic resistance develops, the development...

Antibiotics: Is a Strong Offense the Best Defense? (Part 1 of 3) MWV

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Will we become defenseless against bacteria? Will bacteria always find a way to infect and even kill us? The emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria poses an enormous problem around the world. Scientists believe that the overuse of antibiotics is increasing the appearance of these pathogens. In the US, increasing casualties resulting from drug resistant staphylococcus infections received wide media attention. While antibiotics only work on bacterial infections, many patients...

The Singing Toxicologist

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
He's been referred to as the "Elvis of E. coli", the "Sinatra of Salmonella," and in this episode of MicrobeWorld Video the "singing toxicologist." Whatever you call him, Carl Winter, Extension Food Toxicologist and Director of the FoodSafe Program at UC Davis, performs parodies of contemporary popular music by modifying lyrics to address food safety issues such as bacterial contamination, irradiation, biotechnology, government regulation, and pesticides. The goal of his songs is to provide...

MWV02 -AMNH - Save the Microbes Save the World – Part 1

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Part 1 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural Historys 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet. The panel was introduced by Michael Novacek, Senior Vice President and Provost of Science for the AMNH and moderated by Julie Burstein, Public Radio International and WNYC Radio’s Studio 360. Panelists include: # Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland...

MWV03 – AMNH - Save the Microbes Save the World – Part 2

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Part 2 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural History’s 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet. The panel was introduced by Michael Novacek, Senior Vice President and Provost of Science for the AMNH and moderated by Julie Burstein, Public Radio International and WNYC Radio’s Studio 360. Panelists include: # Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor, University of Maryland...

MWV04 - AMNH Part 3

submitted by: MicrobeWorld

Part 3 of a video podcast from the American Museum of Natural History’s 2007 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series entitled Save the Microbes, Save the World: The Fate of Microbial Life on a Changing Planet.

Return to Zambia MWV 17

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
The American Society for Microbiology is helping African nations foster a scientific community that is better able to address the current and future problems that threaten not only the local population, but the world at large. Like many African countries, Zambia and South Africa are deeply affected by HIV and tuberculosis, as well as a number of other infectious diseases. In March of 2008, ASM President Cliff Houston, Ph.D., traveled to Zambia and South Africa to gauge and assess the...

Canary in a Coal Mine (MWV16)

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Coral reefs are dying a death of a thousand cuts and their disappearance threatens not only the incredibly diverse ecosystem that depends on them, but also human health and welfare. In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video marine scientists Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Ph.D. , chair of marine studies at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and Kiho Kim, Ph.D. , director of the environmental studies program at American University, explain the important relationship between microbes...