David Bruce, JGI @ '09 DOE JGI User Meeting

submitted by: JGI

David Bruce speaking at the "JGI 101 workshop" tutorial, 2009 DOE JGI User Meeting

"Phylochip Analysis of Microbial Diversity" - Gary Andersen, LBNL @ '09 DOE JGI User Meeting

submitted by: JGI

Gary Andersen Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) presentation for DOE JGI '09 User Meeting on March 26, 2009, introduction by Len Pennacchio (JGI).

Cheese and Microbes - MicrobeWorld Video - Ep. 28

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Fine cheeses are like fine wines. Producing and aging them properly is both an art and a science. From cave-aging to the use of raw milk, watch Dr. Catherine Donnelly, co-director of the Vermont Institute for Artisan Cheeses, describe the microbial world of cheese. Listeria and Salmonella are just a couple of the pathogens that pose a risk to cheese consumers. In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video, Dr. Donnelly explains how these risks are mitigated through strict processing...

Very Brief Intro to Microbes

submitted by: dpearson

R Manroe, CPH Teacher, gives a very brief intro about microbes / micro organisms. This video is a demo of possibilities of what might be used as part of a MicroBlitz booth.

"Reading and Writing the Genetic Code"- Craig Venter @ '09 DOE JGI User Meeting

submitted by: JGI

Craig Venter (JCVI) keynote talk for DOE JGI '09 User Meeting on March 27, 2009.

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 4: Targeting M. tuberculosis Carbon Metabolism In Vivo (26:12)

submitted by: video_collector
All pathogens must acquire and assimilate nutrients from their hosts in order to grow and multiply -- our tissues are literally their food -- yet surprisingly little is known about this fundamental aspect of the pathogenic lifestyle. Accumulating evidence suggests that M. tuberculosis might utilize fatty acids as its principal carbon and energy source during infection. The fourth part of this lecture describes work in our laboratory that is focused on identifying the metabolic pathways that...

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 3: Phenotypic Heterogeneity and Antibiotic Tolerance (27:15)

submitted by: video_collector
The principal obstacle to successful treatment of tuberculosis is the lengthy duration of current regimens, which require administration of multiple drugs for 6-9 months. The requirement for prolonged therapy is attributed to sub-populations of bacillary "persisters" that are refractory to antimicrobials. The persisters are not drug-resistant in the conventional (heritable) sense and it is a mystery why they are spared whilst their genetically identical siblings are killed. The third part of...

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 2: Tools for Tuberculosis Control: Not Just a Problem of Implementation (28:18)

submitted by: video_collector
Tuberculosis remains one of the most important causes of human disease and death despite the introduction of vaccination in 1921 and chemotherapy in 1952. Although these interventions are inexpensive and widely available their impact is limited. The effectiveness of vaccination is unclear; in clinical trials, the protection conferred by vaccination has been variable and generally poor. Although chemotherapy can be highly effective, multiple drugs must be administered for 6-9 months to...

Single molecule analyses of DNA in environmental microbes

submitted by: dougramsey
Comprehensive characterization of genomic composition in environmental microbial samples has been challenging, because the majority of microorganisms are difficult to culture. Additional challenges include a high degree of genetic diversity between and within species, various level of relative abundance and ubiquitous presence of cell-free DNA. Single cells or single molecules genomic assays hold great promise for tackling these challenges. Recent progresses in the developments of these...

Deep-Ocean Metagenomics: Comparative Investigations of Microbes Inhabiting Hydrothermal Vents and the Cold Deep Ocean

submitted by: dougramsey
The deep-ocean accounts for the majority of the water on our planet. While the cold deep-ocean is the dominant nutrient-challenged ecosystem, hydrothermal vents represent oases along tectonically active areas of the seafloor. Hydrothermal vents and the surrounding cold deep-ocean each support unique communities of microbes and viruses that have become highly adapted to local conditions. Through cycles of infection and host cell lysis, bacteriophages (viruses that specifically infect...