GREEN REVOLUTION: WIND POWER

submitted by: nsf
Kathryn Johnson, an electrical engineer at the Colorado School of Mines, studies large utility-scale wind turbines. Kathryn’s research aims to make the turbines more efficient in order to capture as much of the wind’s energy as possible. We also visited NSF’s National Center for Atmospheric Research, where scientists are working with local utility companies to create an advanced wind energy prediction system. Using data from sensors mounted on each turbine, the system generates a...

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SNOWBOARDING

submitted by: nsf

The stakes are high for the snowboarders in Vancouver as they try to master new tricks to unseat the star of Torino, American Shaun White. But to get "max air" off the half-pipe without losing their balance, they might want to check out this experiment that Paul Doherty, a senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, cooked up, using a skateboard and a glass of water.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SLAPSHOT PHYSICS

submitted by: nsf

One of the most popular team sports in the Winter Olympics is hockey. More than just a physical game, for scientists, it's a showcase for physics on ice--especially when it comes to the slapshot. Three-time Olympian Julie Chu, Thomas Humphrey, a senior scientist at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, and Katharine Flores, an associate professor in the department of materials science and engineering at Ohio State University, break down the science of hockey's hardest shot.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SAFETY GEAR

submitted by: nsf

As athletes push themselves to their limits and sometimes crash or collide, they rely on protective gear to keep them safe. NSF-funded scientists Katharine Flores, an associate professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Ohio State University, and Melissa Hines, the director of the Cornell University Center for Materials Research, explain the physics of a collision and exactly how this gear, especially safety helmets, works to prevent injury.

SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SCIENCE FRICTION

submitted by: nsf

Curling has been in the Winter Olympics for four years now, but it still seems a little strange to most of us. John Shuster, the captain--or "skip"--of the U.S. Curling Team in Vancouver, explains this unusual sport, and NSF-funded scientists Sam Colbeck, a retired scientist from the U.S. Army Cold Regions Lab and physicist George Tuthill of Plymouth State University explain the friction that makes it all work.

SCIENCE OF SPEED: CAR SAFETY

submitted by: nsf

Conservation of energy explains how NASCAR's new car helped driver Michael McDowell walk away from a scary crash at Texas Motor Speedway in 2008.

Science of NFL Football - Newton's Third Law of Motion

submitted by: nsf

"Science of NFL Football" is a 10-part video series funded by the National Science Foundation and produced in partnership with the National Football League. In this segment, NBC's Lester Holt breaks down Isaac Newton's Third Law of Motion and how energy transfers between football players who collide during a game. Professors Tony Schmitz of the University of Florida and Jim Gates of the University of Maryland explain why momentum can keep a player moving or stop them in their tracks.

Why I Like Science

submitted by: cefox

This video is a short video on why I like science.
The roller coaster is my custom design for a B&M Floorless coaster called Sky Runner designed by me using NoLimits Coaster Simulator.

Science behind Roller Coaster

submitted by: superman
My topic is about exploring the science behind the Roller Coasters. I had a toy kit with plasic parts which I used to build a roller coaster. It took me all night and the morning to finish it. But when it was done, it was cool and fun to play with. My friends loved it. This work I did building the plastic roller coaster, made me wonder how the real ones worked. I was also at Cedarpoint in June. I kept thinking how much fun science and technology provide to us. Part of my reason for me to...