MWV Episode 72 - Jonathan Eisen - Evolvability, the Built Environment and Open Science

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Jonathan Eisen is an evolutionary biologist, currently working at University of California, Davis and is the academic editor-in-chief of the open-access journal PLoS Biology. On this episode, Jonathan talks about "evolvability," the probability that organisms can invent new functions. To do this, he has been using genome data in conjunction with experimental information to try and understand the mechanisms by which new functions have originated. Another area of interest for Eisen is the...

Jonathan Eisen and the GEBA project - video linked to news release re Dec. 2009 Nature paper

submitted by: JGI

DOE JGI Phylogenomics Program Head and UC Davis professor Jonathan Eisen discusses the GEBA project in this complement to the news release regarding the GEBA paper published in the journal Nature on December 24, 2009.

Jonathan Eisen discusses GEBA project at DOE JGI

submitted by: JGI

Jonathan Eisen spoke about the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) at the DOE JGI on October 27, 2009.

Nikos Kyrpides on a GSC Global Genome Census at GSC8

submitted by: JGI

Nikos Kyrpides of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses the notion of a global genome census at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

Tim Harkins on "The 8 day challenge for 8 genomes"

submitted by: JGI

Tim Harkins of Roche Diagnostics talks about what he calls "The Edwards & Eisen Challenge" at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM on May 27, 2009.

"Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA)"- Jonathan Eisen @ '09 DOE JGI User Meeting

submitted by: JGI

Jonathan Eisen, (UC Davis) presentation for DOE JGI '09 User Meeting on March 26, 2009, introduction by Dan Rokhsar (JGI).

A Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) and the Search for the Dark Matter of the Biological Universe

submitted by: dougramsey
There is a glaring gap in microbial genome sequence availability – the currently available genome sequences show a highly biased phylogenetic distribution compared to the extent of microbial diversity known today. This bias has resulted in major limitations in our knowledge of microbial genome complexity and our understanding of the evolution, physiology and metabolic capacity of microbes. Although there have been small efforts in sequencing genomes from across the tree of life for...