SCIENCE OF THE WINTER OLYMPICS: SAFETY GEAR

submitted by: nsf

As athletes push themselves to their limits and sometimes crash or collide, they rely on protective gear to keep them safe. NSF-funded scientists Katharine Flores, an associate professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Ohio State University, and Melissa Hines, the director of the Cornell University Center for Materials Research, explain the physics of a collision and exactly how this gear, especially safety helmets, works to prevent injury.

Boxing Injuries Presenting to US Emergency Departments, 1990-2008

submitted by: tmehan
ABSTRACT Background: Boxing injuries can have serious consequences. Purpose: To examine the epidemiology of boxing injuries in the United States with attention to head injuries and children. Methods: National estimates of boxing injuries were calculated using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. Injury rates per 1000 participants for the year 2003 were calculated using boxing participation data. Results: An estimated 165 602 individuals (95% CI: 134 891 – 196...
Authors: Matthew Potter, Ashley Snyder, Gary a. Smith

Cytokines and Neutrophins in Neuroprotection

submitted by: alex01
Dr. Michael Spedding published recently a review on the role of cytokines and neurotrophins in disease. Neurotrophins (e.g. BDNF) have beneficial effects on neuronal plasticity and brain metabolism. Inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL1beta)oppose the effects of neurotrophins. Both, neurotrophins and cytokines are targets for the development of new drugs affecting central nervous system. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main activity-dependent neurotrophic factor. Interleukin 1beta...