Introduction to Biomedical Ontologies #4: Ontology Term Enrichment Using RatMine

submitted by: jennifer.r.smith
You've done your experiments and you have a list of genes that might be of interest, but…what now? Or you keep seeing the term "ontology term enrichment analysis" in the papers you're reading and, well, you have a vague idea of what that means, but you aren't really sure. Whether you're interested in information about gene functions, diseases, phenotypes or pathways, this video provides an overview of what ontology term enrichment analysis is and how you can use the "widgets" in RatMine...

Sequencing Centers Panel at SFAF

submitted by: JGI
From left to right: Faye Schilkey of NCGR, Johar Ali of OICR, Darren Grafham of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Donna Muzny of the Baylor College of Medicine, Bob Fulton of Washington University, Mike Fitzgerald of the Broad Institute, Jessica Hostetler of the J. Craig Venter Institute and Chris Daum of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discuss sequencing technologies, applications and pipelines on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM.

Mike Fitzgerald on "Sequencing at the Broad"

submitted by: JGI

Mike Fitzgerald of the Broad Institute discusses sequencing platforms and pipeline overviews on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM.

Nicole Rosenzweig on “Data Management Requirements for the Rapid Identification and Characterization of Unknown Genomic Samples”

submitted by: JGI

Nicole Rosenzweig of OptiMetrics discusses the development of informatics infrastructure for studying bacterial pathogens on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM.

Introduction to Biomedical Ontologies 3: Anatomy of an Ontology Annotation, part 2

submitted by: jennifer.r.smith
Are you missing the added value that you could be getting from ontology annotations? You know what ontologies are—maybe you've even used them on occasion. But if the only part of an ontology annotation that you take into account is the term itself, you could be skipping over valuable information that the other components of annotations supply. This video will give you insight into what that "valuable information" is and how to interpret what you see when you examine ontology annotations.

Introduction to Biomedical Ontologies #2: Anatomy of an Ontology Annotation, part 1

submitted by: jennifer.r.smith
Do you find that, like many who use biomedical ontologies, the only part of an ontology "annotation" you use is the ontology term itself? Perhaps you've noticed from time to time that there are some other things that seem to tag along with the ontology term but never really paid attention to those. Or perhaps you are just learning about ontologies and you want to know where the ontology "annotations" come from and what they are based on. This video gives a general overview of how ontology...

Introduction to Biomedical Ontologies 1: What is an Ontology?

submitted by: jennifer.r.smith

While reading an article or looking at a website, have you ever seen the term “ontology” and wondered what that meant? Do you hear people talking about using ontologies and ask yourself what the hubbub is about? This video is designed to help answer those questions. Here is a beginner’s look at what an ontology is and why ontologies are an important tool in the scientist’s toolbox.

Observatories in the Context of the Digitl Continent: CZOs and HIS

submitted by: cmatiuk

CUAHSI 10/13/2006 Cyberseminar presentation by Rick Hooper, Executive Director of CUAHSI

Informatics and Experimental Strategies for De Novo Genome Sequencing with Short Read

submitted by: dougramsey

Informatics and Experimental Strategies for De Novo Genome Sequencing with Short Reads presented by Elliott Margulies, National Human Genome Research Institute

Reconstruction of Alternative Splice Variants and Associated Abundances from Short Sequence Reads (CSHL Genome Informatics Conference 2008)

submitted by: micha
The FLUX CAPACITOR : next generation sequencing technologies provide an unprecedented capacity for surveying the nucleic acid content of cells. This profound sequencing depth may allow in particular for exhaustively sequencing through the large dyanimc range of RNA abundances in the cell, overcoming limitations imposed by current (random) clone selection approaches. However, the very short reads produced by the most cost-effective such technologies make the reconstruction of complete RNA...