Protein Secretion and Vesicle Traffic : Part 3: Human Diseases of Vesicle Budding (32:28)

submitted by: scivee-team
Human COPII genes are duplicated and some may have evolved specialized functions. Two rare human diseases affect the activity of one of two copies of Sar1 and the Sec23A subunit of the COPII coat. Anderson's disease results in the failure of enterocytes of the absorptive epithelium to secrete large lipoprotein particles called chylomicrons. Point mutations in one of two copies of Sar1 results in the accumulation of chylomicrons in the ER. CLSD, a rare craniofacial disorder likely due to the...

Protein Secretion and Vesicle Traffic: Part 2: Biochemical Reconstitution of Transport Vesicle Budding (25:14)

submitted by: scivee-team
Secretion mutants that block protein exit from the endoplasmic reticulum define genes involved in the formation, targeting and fusion of a small vesicle intermediate. SEC genes corresponding to the mutants defective in vesicle budding define the cytoplasmic machinery responsible for transport vesicle morphogenesis. A biochemical reaction that reproduces ER vesicle budding was reconstituted with gently-broken yeast cells and pure recombinant Sec proteins required in vivo for this budding...

David Gordon on "Consed 19.0, Crossmatch Adapted for Solexa and 454 Reads"

submitted by: JGI

David Gordon from the University of Washington speaks at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM on May 29, 2009.

Evan Eichler on “Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions” - Part II

submitted by: JGI

Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 2 of 2.

Evan Eichler on “Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions” - Part I

submitted by: JGI

Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 1 of 2.

The Problem of Regeneration: Part 3: Molecular Basis of Regeneration: Planarians as a Model System (43:54)

submitted by: video_collector

In the third and last part of this lecture, I will introduce the model system we have developed to study animal regeneration, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. I will review its anatomy, and the biological attributes that make these animals extraordinarily well suited to dissect the molecular and cellular basis of regeneration. I will also discuss recent work from my laboratory aimed at identifying molecules associated with regenerative capacities.

The Problem of Regeneration: Part 2: Principles of Planarian Regeneration (32:49)

submitted by: video_collector

In this second part of the lecture, I will briefly review the rich history of planarian research, followed by a summary of the central principles of planarian regeneration that have been derived from this extensive, often fascinating body of experimental work.

Malaria presented by Joseph DeRisi Part 3: Drug Development (24:13)

submitted by: video_collector

This brief set of three lectures gives a very general overview of malaria, the disease and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form. Basic research as well as drug development efforts will also be covered in parts two and three of this series.

Malaria presented by Joseph DeRisi: Part 2 Research (16:52)

submitted by: video_collector

This brief set of three lectures gives a very general overview of malaria, the disease and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form. Basic research as well as drug development efforts will also be covered in parts two and three of this series.

Cytoskeletal Motor Proteins: Part 3: Mining the Genome for Mitotic Treasures (33:41)

submitted by: scivee-team
The third (last) part of the lecture is on mitosis, the process by which chromosomes are aligned and then segregated during cell division. I will describe our efforts to find new proteins that are important for mitosis through a high throughput RNAi screen. I will discuss how we technically executed the screen and then focus on new proteins that are we discovered that are involved in generating the microtubules that compose the mitotic spindle. I also discuss the medical importance of...