African American women less likely to receive improved surgical procedure for breast cancer

submitted by: mdanderson
African American women with early stage, invasive breast cancer were 13 percent less likely than Caucasian women with the same diagnosis to receive a minimally invasive technique, axillary sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy, years after the procedure had become the standard of surgical care, according to research from MD Anderson Cancer Center. The older technique, axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), is associated with a higher rate of lymphedema and worse outcome. Dalliah Black, M.D.,...

Jews and Arabs in the same region in Israel exhibit major differences in dietary patterns

submitted by: kathleena
The Jewish majority and Arab minority populations in Israel exhibit disparities in nutrition-related chronic diseases, but comparative population-based dietary studies are lacking. We evaluated ethnic differences in dietary patterns in a population-based cross-sectional study of Arab and Jewish urban adults (n=1,104; aged 25-74 y). Dietary intake was assessed with an interviewer-administered quantified FFQ. We used principal-component analysis to identify 4 major dietary patterns: Ethnic,...
Authors: K Abu-Saad, H Murad, F Lubin, LS Freedman, A Ziv, G Alpert, A Atamna, O Kalter-Leibovici

Health disparities impact everyone: Lovell Jones, Ph.D., explains

submitted by: mdanderson
Society has readily associated health disparities with a certain group of people, but it has a much bigger target -- everyone. "Any circumstance that serves as a barrier to receiving health care is considered a health disparity," says Lovell Jones, Ph.D., director of the Dorothy I. Height Center for Health Equity and Evaluation Research (CHEER) and Distinguished Teaching Professor at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Jones' ongoing efforts to eliminate health...

The Effectiveness of the FLU-FOBT Program in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial

submitted by: MBPotter
Background: The FLU–FOBT Program is an intervention in which nurses provide home fecal occult blood tests (FOBTs) to eligible patients during annual influenza vaccination (FLU) campaigns. The effectiveness of the FLU–FOBT Program when implemented during primary care visits has not been extensively studied. Purpose: The effectiveness of the FLU–FOBT Program was tested as adapted for use during primary care visits in community clinics serving multiethnic patients with low baseline...
Authors: Michael b. Potter