Genes and Cells that Determine the Lifespan of C. elegans - Part 1: An Evolutionarily-Conserved Regulatory System for Aging (42:46)

submitted by: video_collector
Once it was thought that aging was just a random and haphazard process. Instead, the rate of aging turns out to be subject to regulation by transcription factors that respond to hormones and other signals. In the nematode C. elegans, in which many key discoveries about aging were first made, the aging process is subject to regulation by food intake, sensory perception, and signals from the reproductive system. Changing genes and cells that affect aging can lengthen lifespan by six fold, and...

Some prefer blue jeans...RGD prefers disease genes

submitted by: dabraham
Who knew you could find disease genes without even stepping into the laboratory? This video provides a tutorial on how to utilize the Disease Portals on the Rat Genome Database website at http://rgd.mcw.edu/wg/portals . These portals allow you to search for disease, phenotype, biological process, and pathway specific rat, mouse, and human genes and data. See our RGD website at http://rgd.mcw.edu for more information and tools for researchers...

Breast cancer genes protect against some leukemias and lymphomas

submitted by: BernardFriedenson
Carriers of mutations in the breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 have very high lifetime risks for breasts/ovarian cancer. Products of either gene have multiple functions including involvement in error-free double strand break repair. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are both components of a DNA damage response pathway that has the ability to return fragments of broken chromosomes back into their correct positions without ligating them elsewhere. But cancers at other sites may also occur without this...

Microblogology

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Six Science bloggers talk about why they blog, the role of blogging in science, feedback they've received, and the greatest microbiological discovery in the past decade. Bloggers featured include: John Logsdon Sex, Genes & Evolution http://www.johnlogsdon.blogspot.com Jonathan Badger T. Taxus http://ttaxus.blogspot.com Yersinia http://www.myspace.com/lenore138 Moselio Schaechter Small Things Considered http://schechter.asmblog.org Tara Smith Aetiology...

Protein Synthesis

submitted by: jmath

A demosntration of Protein synthesis expressed through dance. The film was directed in 1971 by Robert Alan Weiss for the Department of Chemistry of Stanford University and narrated by Paul Berg, a 1980 Nobel Prize winner for Chemistry. It is imprinted with the "free love" aura of the period, and continues to be shown in biology classes today. It has inspired a series of similar funny attempts at vulgarizing protein synthesis.