Saving our ecologically important coral reefs

submitted by: nsf
Coral reefs are dying. Harboring some of the most diverse species of marine life, corals are ecologically important. Paul Sikkel, a marine ecologist from Arkansas State University, explains why many coral reefs are dying and how we can save them. For more information, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_summ.jsp?cntn_id=129643 http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=124768 http://www.livescience.com/40687-gnathia-marleyi-controversy-nsf-ria.htm...

Coral Reefs -- Our Ocean Ecosystem Engineers

submitted by: UMiami_RSMAS

UM Rosenstiel School Coral Reef Biologist Andrew Baker studies how coral reefs are impacted by climate change and other threats worlsdwide. Corals are important ocean ecosystem engineers, similar to trees in a rainforest, they provide essential habitat to one-third of all ocean life.

Life Behind Bars

submitted by: ucsandiego

Marine biologists employ genetic barcoding in the quest to positively identify fish species.

http://explorations.ucsd.edu/Features/2009/Life_Behind_Bars/

Canary in a Coal Mine (MWV16)

submitted by: MicrobeWorld
Coral reefs are dying a death of a thousand cuts and their disappearance threatens not only the incredibly diverse ecosystem that depends on them, but also human health and welfare. In this episode of MicrobeWorld Video marine scientists Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Ph.D. , chair of marine studies at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and Kiho Kim, Ph.D. , director of the environmental studies program at American University, explain the important relationship between microbes...