Hemianopic and Quadrantanopic Field Loss, Eye and Head Movements, and Driving

submitted by: jowood
Purpose: To compare eye and head movements, lane keeping and vehicle control of drivers with hemianopic and quadrantanopic field defects with controls, and to identify differences in these parameters between hemianopic and quadrantanopic drivers rated safe to drive by a clinical driving rehabilitation specialist (CDRS) compared to those rated as unsafe. Methods: Eye and head movements and lane-keeping were rated in 22 persons with homonymous hemianopic defects and 8 with quadrantanopic...
Authors: Lanning Kline, Dawn Decarlo, Ronald Braswell, Michael Vaphiades, Jennifer Elgin, Gerald Mcgwin, Joanne Wood, Cynthia Owsley

How Magic Changes Our Expectations About Autism

submitted by: GustavKuhn
In the vanishing-ball illusion, the magician’s social cues misdirect the audience’s expectations and attention so that the audience “sees” a ball vanish in the air. Because individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are less sensitive to social cues and have superior perception for nonsocial details compared with typically developing individuals, we predicted that they would be less susceptible to the illusion. Surprisingly, the opposite result was found, as individuals with ASD...
Authors: Anastasia Kourkoulou, Gustav Kuhn, Susan r. Leekam