Advances in Proton Therapy, Pencil Beam Technology Reach Patient Care

submitted by: mdanderson

In treating cancer, the pencil beam technology for proton therapy delivers a single, narrow proton beam (about a centimeter in diameter) that is magnetically swept across the tumor, depositing the radiation dose like a painter

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 4: Targeting M. tuberculosis Carbon Metabolism In Vivo (26:12)

submitted by: video_collector
All pathogens must acquire and assimilate nutrients from their hosts in order to grow and multiply -- our tissues are literally their food -- yet surprisingly little is known about this fundamental aspect of the pathogenic lifestyle. Accumulating evidence suggests that M. tuberculosis might utilize fatty acids as its principal carbon and energy source during infection. The fourth part of this lecture describes work in our laboratory that is focused on identifying the metabolic pathways that...

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 3: Phenotypic Heterogeneity and Antibiotic Tolerance (27:15)

submitted by: video_collector
The principal obstacle to successful treatment of tuberculosis is the lengthy duration of current regimens, which require administration of multiple drugs for 6-9 months. The requirement for prolonged therapy is attributed to sub-populations of bacillary "persisters" that are refractory to antimicrobials. The persisters are not drug-resistant in the conventional (heritable) sense and it is a mystery why they are spared whilst their genetically identical siblings are killed. The third part of...

Tuberculosis: A Persistent Threat to Global Health - Part 2: Tools for Tuberculosis Control: Not Just a Problem of Implementation (28:18)

submitted by: video_collector
Tuberculosis remains one of the most important causes of human disease and death despite the introduction of vaccination in 1921 and chemotherapy in 1952. Although these interventions are inexpensive and widely available their impact is limited. The effectiveness of vaccination is unclear; in clinical trials, the protection conferred by vaccination has been variable and generally poor. Although chemotherapy can be highly effective, multiple drugs must be administered for 6-9 months to...

The Dynamic Bacterial Cell: Part 2: Escalating Infectious Disease Threat (39:37)

submitted by: video_collector
Many antibiotics, which we have taken foregranted since the 1950's, are now becoming ineffective because bacteria have developed ways of acquiring resistance. The development of new antibiotics is lagging behind the loss of the old ones in this race to combat infectious disease. Simultaneously, there is an increase in infectious diseases around the world due to over population, globalization and urbanization. This results in a lethal combination of emerging diseases and loss of effective...

Technical Issues Associated with Future Large-Scale Cellulosic Biofuels Production: Part 2: Cellulosic Biofuels (48:15)

submitted by: video_collector

In the second segment, the potential for various types of biofuels are compared and some of the technical challenges in production of cellulosic fuels are outlined.

Host-Pathogen Interaction and Human Disease: Part 2: Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Cancer (48:57)

submitted by: video_collector
Helicobacter pylori lives in the human stomach. It causes gastritis, ulcer disease and even gastric cancer. Some H. pylori can inject a protein, CagA, into gastric epithelial cells. CagA interacts with the tight junctions that bind cells together and with signaling molecules affecting motility and proliferation. CagA is associated with ulcer disease and cancer but we don't understand how it works to favor malignancy. Not long ago in history most humans carried H. pylori ; the incidence of...

Malaria presented by Joseph DeRisi Part 3: Drug Development (24:13)

submitted by: video_collector

This brief set of three lectures gives a very general overview of malaria, the disease and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form. Basic research as well as drug development efforts will also be covered in parts two and three of this series.

Malaria presented by Joseph DeRisi: Part 2 Research (16:52)

submitted by: video_collector

This brief set of three lectures gives a very general overview of malaria, the disease and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form. Basic research as well as drug development efforts will also be covered in parts two and three of this series.

Intracellular Parasitism by Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania": Part 3: Current Research: Strategies for Cell Invasion and Intracellular Survival (33:43)"

submitted by: video_collector

In the third part of this lecture, I will discuss current work from our laboratory on mechanisms used by the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania to interact with mammalian cells. In addition to clarifying specific molecular strategies used by these parasites to infect and survive within host cells, these studies also led, in some instances, to unexpected insights on novel pathways regulating mammalian cell function.