Supplementing a low protein diet with dibasic amino acids increases urinary calcium excretion in young women

submitted by: jld03009
Increasing dietary protein within a physiologic range stimulates intestinal calcium absorption, but it is not known if specific amino acids or dietary protein as a whole are responsible for this effect. Therefore, we selectively supplemented a lowprotein (0.7 g/kg) diet with either the calcium-sensing receptor-activating amino acids (CaSR-AAAs) L-tryptophan, L-phenylalanine, and L-histidine, or the dibasic amino acids (DAAs) L-arginine and L-lysine, to achieve intakes comparable to the...
Authors: Jessica Bihuniak, Rebecca Sullivan, Christine Simpson, Donna Caseria, Tania Huedo-Medina, Kimberly O’Brien, Jane Kerstetter, Karl Insogna

Dietary protein and bone health: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

submitted by: adarling
BACKGROUND: There has been a resurgence of interest in the controversial relation between dietary protein and bone health. OBJECTIVE: This article reports on the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the relation between protein and bone health in healthy human adults. DESIGN: The MEDLINE (January 1966 to September 2007) and EMBASE (1974 to July 2008) databases were electronically searched for all relevant studies of healthy adults; studies of calcium excretion or calcium balance were...
Authors: Al Darling, Dj Millward, Dt Torgerson, Ce Hewitt, Sa Lanham-new